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19452.7.12

HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY

FROM THE LIBRARY OF PROF. GEUFIGE F. SWAIN

OCT. 20, 1933

CONTENTS.

......447

......448

.......452

.. 453

PAGE

PAGE

LIFE OF SIR WALTER SCOTT. BY WIL MISCELLANEOUS POEMS, continued :-

LIAM CHAMBERS, LL.D....

V

Flora MacIvor's Song.........

THE LAY OF THE LAST MINSTREL.

1

Farewell to Mackenzie, High Chief of

MARMION........

Kintail.....

THE LADY OF THE LAKE.

..126

War-Song of Lachlan, High Chief of

THE VISION OF Don RODERICK.

.193

Maclean..

.449

ROKEBY .........

The Dance of Death,

.......449

THE BRIDAL OF TRIERMAIN; OR, THE VALE The Troubadour.

..... 451

OF ST. JOHN.

.276

Song from the French...

..452

THE LORD OF THE ISLES..

..307

Song on the Lifting of the Banner of

THE FIELD OF WATERLOO......

the House of Buccleuch...

HAROLD THE DAUNTLESS.

................377

Lullaby of an Infant Chief..

CONTRIBUTIONS TO MINSTRELSY OF THE “ Twist ye, Twine ye

.453

Scottish BORDER:

The Dying Gipsy's Dirge.

453

Thomas the Rhymer.

.411

The Return to Ulster....

454

Glenfinlas; or, Lord Ronald's Coro Jock of Hazeldean.

.454

nach

Pibroch of Donald Dhu..

The Eve of St. John.....

422 Nora's Vow...

Cadyow Castle......

.426

Macgregor's Gathering.

456

The Gray Brother...

.......430

Time...

..457

BALLADS, TRANSLATED, OR IMITATED),

Elspeth's Ballad..

FROM THE GERMAN, &c.:-

Major Bellenden's Song..

.458

Verses found in Bothwell's Pocket.

William and Helen.....

..433

book.

.458

The Erl-King....

..438

The Search after Happiness..

MISCELLANEOUS POEMS:-

The Sun upon the Weirdlaw Hill... 465

The Violet.....

439 The Monks of Bangor's March........465

Barthram's Dirge...

..439

Mackrimmon's Lament..............466

The Lament of the Border Widow... 439 Donald Caird's come again..........467

A Lyke-Wake Dirge..

440 Madge Wil lfire's Songs...

...467

Helvellyn....

440 Lucy Ashton's Song...

..469

The Dying Bard.

Norman the Forester's Song.

The Maid of Toro....

Annot Lyle's Songs...

469

Wandering Willie....

The Orphan Maid....

Hunting Song...

.443

The Crusader's Return.

.470

Epitaph designed for a Monument in

The Barefooted Friar.

..471

Lichfield Cathedral.

Saxon War-Song..

The Bold Dragoon......

Rebecca's Hymn...

......472

On the Massacre of Glencoe..

The Black Knight's Song............473

For a' that an'a' that.

Duet between the Black Knight and

Davie Gellatley's Songs...... .446

Wamba......

..473

St. Swithin's Chair..

446 Funeral Hyma..

474

....469

..470

.....471

...494

...520

PAGE

PAGE

MISCELLANEOUS POEMS, continued : MISCELLANEOUS POEMS, continued :-

Songs of the White Lady of Avenel..474 Song of Blondel-The Bloody Vest... 492

Songs in Halbert's Second Interview Song-Bonny Dundee.....

with the White Lady of Avenel....477

HALIDON HILL: A Dramatic Sketch from

The White Lady to Mary Avenel. ...478

Scottish History...

....496

The White Lady to Edward Glendin-

ning....

.478 ADDITIONAL COLLECTED POEMS:-

The White Lady's Farewell. .479 War-Song of the Royal Edinburgh

Border Ballad..

479 Light Dragoons.

Goldthred's Song.

479

The Death of Keeldar.....

.521

The Song of the Tempest.

.480 The Resolve.....

.522

Claud Halcro's Song..

Mr. Kemble's Farewell Address.. ...523

The Song of Harold Harfager........481

Lines written for Miss Smith.. .524

Song of the Mermaids and Mermen..481

The Foray...

Norna's Song.....

.482 Lines addressed to M. Alexandre.....524

Claud Halcro and Norna.

.482 Epitaph on Mrs. Erskine...... .525

Song of the Zetland Fisherman, .484 Glee for King Charles....

.525

Cleveland's Songs..

.481 One Hour with Thee...

525

Claud Halcro's Verses.......

485 The Lay of Poor Louise.

.526

Norna's Incantations...

485 Chant over the Dead.

526

On Ettrick Forest's Mountains dun.487 Yes, Thou mayat Sigh.

..526

Farewell to the Muse.......

Oh, Bold and Blue.....

527

The Maid of Isla....

..487

Song of the Judges of the Secret

Carle, now the King's come.

.488

Tribunal.

..527

Song-County Guy..

.491

Songs from the Dramas.

.528

Song-Soldier, Wake........

.491

The Wild Huntsman......

.529

Song-The Truth of Woman.. ..491

The Fire King.....

....532

Ahriman...

491 Frederick and Alice.

035

.....524

..487

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LIFE OF

SIR WALTER SCOTT, BART.

BY

WILLIAM CHAMBERS, LL.D.

SIR WALTER SCOTT, the fourth child of Walter Scott, Writer to the Signet in Edinburgh, was born in that city on the 15th of August, 1771. He came of the old Border family, the Scotts of Harden, an offshoot from the house of Buccleuch. Though he matured into a man of robust health, and of strength nearly herculean, as a child he was feeble and sickly, and very early he was smitten with a lameness which remained with him through life. His childhood was passed for the most part at Sandyknowe, the farm of his grandfather, in Roxburghshire. Here the foundations of his mind were laid; and his early and delighted familiarity with the ballads and legends then floating over all that part of the country, probably did more than any other influence to determine the sphere and modes of his future literary activity. Between the years 1779 and 1783 he attended the High School of Edinburgh, where, despite occasional flashes of talent, he shone considerably more on the playground as a bold, high-spirited and indomitable little fellow, with an odd turn for story-telling, than within he did as a student. In 1783 he went to the University, and for three years he remained there, is it seemed, not greatly to his advantage. Afterwards, in the height of his fame, he was wont to speak with deep regret of his neglect of his early opportunities. But though leaving college but scantly furnished with the knowledge formally taught there, in a desultory way of his own he had been hiving up stores of valuable, though unassorted information.

From his earliest childhood onward, he was a ravenous and insatiable reader; his memory was of extraordinary range and tenacity, and

of what he either read or observed he seems to have forgot almost nothing. Of Latin he knew little; of Greek, less; but a serviceable, if somewhat inexact knowledge of French, Italian, Spanish and German he had acquired, and he continued to retain. On the whole, for his special purposes, his education was perhaps as available as if he had been the pride of all his preceptors. In 1786 he was articled apprentice to his father, in whose office he worked as a clerk till 1792, in which year he was called to the bar. In his profession he had fair success, and in 1797 he was married to Charlotte Margaret Carpenter, a lady of French birth and parentage. Towards the end of 1799, through the interest of his friends, Lord Melville and the Duke of Buccleuch, he was made sheriff-depute of Selkirkshire, an appointment which brought him £300 a year, with not very much to do for it. Meantime, in a tentative and intermittent way, his leisure had been occupied with literature, which more and more distinctly announced itself as the main business of his life.

His first publication, a translation of Bürger's ballads, Lenore and The Irild Iluntsman, was issued in 1796. In 1798 appeared his translation of Goethe's drama of Goetz von Berlichingen ; and in the year following he wrote the fino ballads, Glenfinlas, the Eve of St. John, and the Grey Brother. The year 1802 gave to the world the first two volumes of his Border Minstrelsy, which were followed in 1803 by a third and final one. This work, the fruit of those “ raids ".

-as he called themover the Border counties, in which he had been wont to spend his vacations, was most favourably received by the public, and at once won for him a prominent place among the literary men of the time. In 1894 he issued an edition of the old poem, Sir Tristrem, admirably edited and elucidated by valuable dissertations. Meantime, The Lay of the Laul Minstrel had been in progress, and by its publication in 1805, he became at a bound the most popular author of his day.

During the next ten years, besides a mass of miscellaneous work, the most important items of which were elaborate editions of Dryden (1808) and of Swift (1814), including in either case a Life, he gave to the worid the poems Jarmion (1808), The Lady of the Lake (1810), The Vision of Don Roderick (1811), Rokeby (1813), The Bridal of Triermain, anonymously published (1813), The Lord of the Isles, and The Field of Waterloo.

The enthusiasm with which the earlier of these works were received somewhat began to abate as the series proceeded. The charm of novelty was no longer felt; moreover, a distinct deterioration in quality is not in the later poems to be denied; and in the bold ontbursts of Byron, with his deeper vein of sentiment and concentrated

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