History of the War in the Peninsula, and in the South of France: From the Year 1807 to the Year 1814, Volume 1

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ACDoyleLibrary - LibraryThing

"This is the story of the great Peninsular War, by one who fought through it him-self, and in no history has a more chivalrous and manly account been given of one's enemy. Indeed, Napier seems to me ... Read full review

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 170 - In vain did Soult, by voice and gesture, animate his Frenchmen; in vain did the hardiest veterans. extricating themselves from the crowded columns, sacrifice their lives to gain time for the mass to open out on such a fair field; in vain did the mass itself bear up, and, fiercely striving, fire indiscriminately upon friends and foes, while the horsemen hovering on the flank threatened to charge the advancing line.
Page 170 - Such a gallant line, issuing from the midst of the smoke and rapidly separating itself from the confused and broken multitude, startled the enemy's masses, which were increasing and pressing onwards as to an assured victory ; they wavered, hesitated, and then vomiting forth a storm of fire, hastily endeavoured to enlarge their front, while a fearful discharge of grape from all their artillery whistled through the British ranks. Myers was killed, Cole and the three colonels, Ellis, Blakeney and Hawkshawe,...
Page 170 - ... like a loosened cliff", went headlong down the steep : the rain flowed after in streams discoloured with blood, and eighteen hundred unwounded men, the remnant of six thousand unconquerable British soldiers, stood triumphant on the fatal hill ! CHAPTER VII.
Page 170 - No sudden burst of undisciplined valour, no nervous enthusiasm weakened the stability of their order; their flashing eyes were bent on the dark columns in their front, their measured tread shook the ground, their dreadful volleys swept away the head of every formation, their deafening shouts overpowered the dissonant cries that broke from all parts of the tumultuous crowd, as slowly and with a horrid carnage it was pushed by the incessant vigour of the attack to the farthest edge of the hill. In...
Page 170 - In vain did Soult with voice and gesture animate his Frenchmen ; in vain did the hardiest veterans, breaking from the crowded columns, sacrifice their lives to gain time for the mass to open out on such a fair field ; in vain did the mass itself bear up, and fiercely striving fire indiscriminately upon friends and foes, while the horsemen hovering on the flank threatened to charge the advancing line.
Page 168 - Hay. ketry were incessant, and often within pistol-shot, but the close formation of the French embarrassed their battle, and the British line would not yield them one inch of ground, nor a moment of time to open their ranks. Their fighting was however fierce and dangerous : Stewart was...
Page 168 - His cavalry, indeed, began to hem in that of the allies, but the fire of the horse-artillery enabled Lumley, covered as he was by the bed of the Aroya and supported by the fourth division, to check them on the plain.
Page 27 - Yet so truly brave and hardy were the leaders of the enemy, that each man of the first section raised his musket, and two officers and ten soldiers fell before them. Not a Frenchman had missed his mark ! They could do no more ! The head of their column was violently overturned and driven upon the rear, both flanks were lapped over by the English wings, and three terrible discharges at five yards
Page 39 - The first, extending from Alhandra on the ^"f^;,. Tagus to the mouth of the Zizandre on the sea- Printed for coast, was, following the inflections of the hills, cuiation'oniy twenty-nine miles long. The second, traced at a distance, varying from six to ten miles, in rear of the first, stretched from Quintella on the Tagus to the mouth of the St. Lorenza, being twenty-four miles in length.
Page 40 - Lisbon, where means to retard the enemy were prepared. Of these stupendous lines, the second, whether for strength or importance, was the principal, the others were appendages; the third a mere place of refuge. The first line was originally designed as an advanced work to stem the primary violence of the enemy, and enable the army to take up its ground on the second line without hurry or pressure; but while...

Bibliographic information