Essay the First: On the Kocch, Bódo and Dhimál Tribes, in Three Parts ...

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J. Thomas, 1847 - Bengali language - 200 pages
 

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Page 180 - Take and eat, heretofore you have eaten and drunk with us, you can do so no more ; you were one of us, you can be so no longer ; we come no more to you, come you not to us.
Page 170 - Ojha best knows how !) a hog ; and it is forthwith vowed by the sick man and promised by the exorcist, but only paid •when the former has recovered. On recovery the animal is sacrificed, and its blood offered to the offended deity. I witnessed this ceremony myself among the Dhimals, on which occasion the thirteen deities invoked were...
Page 180 - ... in each of the frequent migrations of the whole people. The boys look after the domestic animals. The women, aided by the girls, are fully employed within doors in spinning, weaving, and dyeing the clothing of the family, in brewing, and in cooking. The state of the arts will be sufficiently and most conveniently illustrated by a description of the house, household furniture, clothes, food, and drinks of the people, preceded by an account of the implements, processes, and products of agriculture....
Page 150 - Tamulian form, on the contrary, there is less height, less symmetry, more dumpiness and flesh : in the Tamulian face, a somewhat lozenge contour caused by the large cheek bones ; less perpendicularity in the features to the front, occasioned not so much by defect of forehead or chin, as by excess of jaws and mouth ; a larger proportion of face to head, and less roundness in the latter; a broader flatter face with features less symmetrical but perhaps more expressive, at least of individuality ; a...
Page 170 - Malevolence appears to be attributed to very few of the gods, though of course all will resent neglect ; but, in general, their natures are deemed benevolent ; and hence the absence of all savage or cruel rites. All diseases, however, are ascribed to supernatural agency. The sick man is supposed to be possessed by one of the deities, who racks him with pains as a punishment for impiety or neglect of the god in question. Hence, not the mediciner but the exorcist is summoned to the sick man's aid.
Page 162 - ... and of the terrene elements — with a vague but impressive reference of the powers displayed by these sensible objects to an immaterial or moral source, unknown indeed, but still adored as Divine, and even as a divine Unity.* It is true that these latter conceptions are too vague to be denominated, strictly speaking, ideas, proper to these people, much less, positive tenets of their creed ; and hence their languages have no word for God, for soul, for heaven, for hell, for sin, for piety, for...
Page 190 - He rises at day-spring, and having performed the offices of nature and washed himself, he proceeds at once to work in his field till noon. He then goes home to take the chief meal of the day, and which consists of rice, pulse, fish or flesh (on alternate days), greens and chillies, with salt — never ghiu — seldom oil. He rests an hour or more at noon, and then resumes his agricultural toils, which are not suspended till nightfall. So soon as he has got home he takes a second meal with his family,...
Page ii - In every extensive jungly or hilly tract throughout the vast continent of India there exist hundreds of thousands of human beings in a state not materially different from that of the Germans as described by Tacitus...
Page 170 - Libations of fermented liquor always accompany sacrifice — because, to confess the whole truth, sacrifice and feast are commutable words, and feasts need to be crowned with copious potations.

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