History of The Arabs

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Macmillan International Higher Education, Sep 26, 2002 - History - 852 pages
This classic history of the Arab peoples is a work of great thoroughness and insight which contains much to satisfy general readers as well as scholars. Here is the story of the rise of Islam in the Middle Ages, its conquests, its empire, its time of greatness and of decay, unrolling one of the richest and most instructive panoramas in history.

For this reissue of the tenth edition, Walid Khalidi gives a brief overview of the history and content of the book, and emphasises the vital importance of Philip K. Hitti's magisterial and scholarly work to on-going attempts to bridge the Arab/Western cultural divide.
 

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I bought this book at an old book market in Cairo many years ago. I found reading it both instructive and entertaining. It gives a very good balance of favorable disposition and scientific rigor. The value of the book lies in the tone in which it is written. I suppose the author must be of Arab Christian descent. This position gives him privileged insight into the language and the culture as an Arab without the prejudice of being a Muslim writing about Islam and the Arabs.
This book is a treasure for those contemplating the idea of writing historical novels. Not only does it provide you with knowledge, but most importantly, with the feeling of living among the Arabs through the rise and fall of their many sultanates, emirates and Caliphates.
Yasser El Helw, November 15th, 2017
 

Contents

THE RISE OF ISLAM AND THE CALIPHAL STATE
109
THE UMAYYAD AND ABBASID EMPIRES
187
THE ARABS IN EUROPE SPAIN AND SICILY
491
THE LAST OF THE MEDIEVAL MOSLEM STATES
615
OTTOMAN RULE AND INDEPENDENCE
707
INDEX
759
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About the author (2002)

PHILIP K. HITTI was born in Lebanon in 1886 and from 1913 til his death in 1978 lived for the most part in USA, teaching first at Columbia and later at Princeton, from which he retired in 1954 as Professor of Semitic Literature and Chairman of the Department of Oriental Languages.

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