Athenae Cantabrigienses, Volume 2

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Deighton, Bell, & Company; [etc., etc. ], 1861
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1858-61/ 2 vols/ 160

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Page 336 - When a man's ways please the Lord, he maketh even his enemies to be at peace with him.
Page 513 - And it came to pass on the morrow, that their rulers, and elders, and scribes, and Annas the high priest, and Caiaphas, and John, and Alexander, and as many as were of the kindred of the high priest, were gathered together at Jerusalem. And when they had set them in the midst, they asked, "By what power, or by what name, have ye done this?
Page 168 - Duchess, with all the household, gentlemen and gentlewomen, were hunting in the park. I found her in her chamber reading...
Page 169 - I am in presence either of father or mother, whether I speak, keep silence, sit, stand, or go, eat, drink, be merry or sad, be sewing, playing, dancing or doing...
Page 159 - The troublesome Raigne and lamentable Death of Edward the Second, King of England: with the tragicall fall of proud Mortimer.
Page 169 - ... else ; I must do it, as it were, in such weight, measure and number, even so perfectly, as God made the world ; or else I am so sharply taunted, so cruelly threatened, yea presently sometimes with pinches, nips, and bobs, and other ways (which I will not name for the honour I bear them) so without measure mis-ordered, that I think myself in hell, till time come that I must go to Mr.
Page 427 - Which of you convinceth me of sin ? And if I say the truth, why do ye not believe me? He that is of God heareth God's words : ye therefore hear them not, because ye are not of God.
Page 265 - His command of imagery is wide, easy, and luxuriant. He threw the soul of harmony into our verse, and made it more warmly, tenderly, and magnificently descriptive than it ever was before, or, with a few exceptions, than it has ever been since. It must certainly be owned, that in description he exhibits nothing of the brief strokes and robust power which characterize the very greatest poets...
Page 367 - A Testimonie of Antiquitie, shewing the auncient fayth in the Church of England touching the Sacrament of the body and bloude of the Lord, here publikely preached, and also receaued in the Saxons' tyme, aboue 600 yeares agoe. Imprinted at London by John Day, dwelling oner Alderagate beneath S.

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