Universal Letter Writer: With Letters from the Writings of Sir Walter Scott, Hannah More, Dr. Johnson, [and Others]. Th which are Added The Complete Petitioner, Forms of Law, Cards of Compliment, &c., Also, A New English Grammar

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T. Nelson and Sons, 1855

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Any idea of the value? I have an 1850 copy of the book. It's about 3"X4.75"X.75". All pages are in good condition but the cover is in fair condition.

Contents

A fathers affection for the conduct of his son exemplified
27
On the practice of virtue
28
On the benefit of early religion
29
On the diligence to be used in youthful studies RC 16 On filial duty in the choice of a profession
30
Soliciting pocketmoney in support of anodest frugality
31
On prudent generosity
32
Brotherly love exemplified 83
34
The character of a worthy family
35
A mothers advice to her daughter 86
36
Advice to a son on travelling and improvement of time
38
A letter written in a playful style from a student to his mother
41
On the improvement of time in youth
45
A humorous letter from a sailor at Plymouth to his wife at London
48
LETTERS OF LOVE COURTSHIP AND MARRIAGE
53
Modesty and assurance exemplified
56
An affectionate mothers recommendation of a dutiful son
57
A more explicatory answer with a description of natures beauties 58 41 A deathbed scene
59
Conjugal felicity and rural life
60
A sensible loveletter
61
A sister requesting the advice of her brother
62
Her brothers answer
63
A declaration of love
64
A romantic love letter
65
A prudent answer
66
Love and duty described
67
On the same subject
68
A young ladys letter to her lover
69
An indulgent fathers account of a dutiful daughter
71
A humorous loveletter
72
From a lover to his mistress lately recovered from sickness
75
Anxiety of the mind under disappointment
76
An orphans submissive resignation to Providence
77
A spirited letter on indifference
78
An excuse
79
Real love and merit exemplified in a letter from a young officer to his mistress
80
Advice to a gentleman in the army
81
From a lady to her aunt immediately after the ceremony of mar riage
83
LETTERS OF FRIENDSHIP 64 Friendship in distress
84
The pleasures of a town residence
85
Against discontent and repining
106
On early female education
107
On the death of a wife
109
An interesting letter on seduction
111
Virtue rewarded
113
A young gentleman after settling in one of the Inns of Court in London writing to his tutor
114
Serious advice to a young lawyer
115
The prospect of death 17
117
On female education
119
Industry asking advice of prudence
121
On an important subject for tradesmen of all professions
122
Indigent old age soliciting assistance from alliance
124
Real generosity
126
LETTERS OF SYMPATHY 88 On the death of a husband God a husband to the widow
130
A sons account of his fathers deathbed
131
Comfort in bereavement
133
Remembrance of ancient friendship
135
On the same subject from Bishop Heber to Miss Stowe
136
On the death of a wife
138
The duty of resignation
139
Dr Johnson on the death of his wife
140
On the loss of a near relation
143
LETTERS OF BUSINESS
145
Youth entering into business soliciting the assistance of those already established
146
On the same subject
147
Compliance with the above request
148
The answer
149
A reasonable answer
150
From a young man inadvertently surprised with an immediate demand for payment
151
Letter Pre Letter
153
A servants fidelity to his master
159
A satisfactory answer to the above
166
A prudent answer
169
Letter of licence
172
A codicil to a will
179
THE COMPLET PETITIONER containing fortythree forms
188
THE LADYS VALENTINE WRITER 81
211
THE GENTLEMANS VALENTINE WRITER
217
Toasts and sentiments
224

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Page 172 - Now know ye, that the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, in consideration...
Page 183 - I or my heirs, executors or administrators, hereafter can, shall or may have, for, upon or by reason of any matter, cause, or thing whatsoever from the beginning of the world to the day of the date of these presents.
Page 86 - The wonder of these sights impels me into night-walks about her crowded streets, and I often shed tears in the motley Strand from fulness of joy at so much life. All these emotions must be strange to you ; so are your rural emotions to me. But consider, what must I have been doing all my life, not to have lent great portions of my heart with usury to such scenes...
Page 88 - Fountain heads, and pathless groves, Places which pale passion loves ! Moonlight walks, when all the fowls Are warmly housed, save bats and owls! A midnight bell, a parting groan...
Page 181 - Day of in the Year of the Reign of our Sovereign LADY VICTORIA, by the Grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland...
Page 177 - God, calling unto mind the mortality of my body, and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die, do make and ordain this my LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT : That is to say, principally and first of all, I give and recommend my soul into the hand of Almighty God that gave it, and my body I recommend to the earth to be buried in decent Christian burial at the discretion of my executor, nothing doubting but at the general resurrection I shall receive the same again by the mighty power of God...
Page 110 - I have lost her when her excellent natural sense was rapidly improving, after eight years of struggle and distress had bound us fast together, and moulded our tempers to each other, — when a knowledge of her worth had refined my youthful love into friendship, before age had deprived it of much of its original ardour, — I lost her, alas ! (the choice of my youth, and the partner of my misfortunes) at a moment when I had the prospect of her sharing my better days.
Page 177 - I shall receive the same again by the mighty Power of God; and as touching such worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this Life, I give...
Page 177 - Calling unto mind the Mortality of my Body. and knowing that it is Appointed for all men once to die. do make and ordain this my last will and Testament that Is to say principally and first of all.
Page 86 - ... tapers, where I might live with handsome visible objects. I consider the clouds above me but as a roof beautifully painted, but unable to satisfy the mind ; and, at last, like the pictures of the apartment of a connoisseur, unable to afford him any longer a pleasure. So fading upon me, from disuse, have been the beauties of Nature, as they have been confinedly called ; so ever fresh, and green and warm are all the inventions of men, and assemblies of men in this great city.

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