A Political Economy of Neotribal Capitalism

Front Cover
Lexington Books, 2000 - History - 265 pages
Among the unintended and largely unforeseen consequences of globalization are the fundamental transformations of local relationships, both economic and cultural, that occur within communities drawn into the predominantly capitalist world economy. Democracy, once considered the essential political mode of regulation for successful capitalist economies, is being replaced by nondemocratic modes of social organization as localized responses to global forces, such as Maori retribalization in New Zealand, are subverted and transformed.

A Political Economy of Neotribal Capitalism looks at the past three decades in New Zealand and the shifts in the relationship between the indigenous Maori people and the dominant Pakeha (white) society to illustrate these fundamental changes to national political, social, and economic structures. The book includes a case study of a Maori family, a theoretical exploration of the concept of "neotribal capitalism", and discussions of themes such as changing socioeconomic relations, new social movements; the indigenization of ethnicity; dominant group-ethnic group realignment; and the antidemocratic ideologies of late capitalism -- themes of interest to students of world political economics, international relations, and anthropology.

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Contents

Introduction
1
Localisation the New Zealand Experience
15
Theorising Neotribal Capitalism
31
Neotraditionalism the Ideology of Retribalisation
41
The Emergence of Neotribal Capitalism
51
A Critique of Culturalism
73
Part Two
89
The Research Studies
91
The Ngati Kuri Tribe
153
A Family Marine Farm
179
Tribal Fisheries
197
The Threat to Democracy
223
NOTES
231
Glossary of Terms
239
Bibliography
241
Index
259

Maori and Pakeha the Bicultural Project
109
Kinship Revival and Retribalisation
135

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About the author (2000)

Elizabeth Rata is Senior Lecturer at Auckland College of Education.

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