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THE

WARS England, Scotland and Ireland,

IN

OR

AN IMPARTIAL ACCOUNT

OF ALL THE
Battles, Sieges, and other remarkable Transactions,

Bevolutions and faccidents,
WHICH HAPPENED FROM THE BEGINNING OF THE REIGN OF

KING CHARLES I. . -'.

IN 1625, TO THE RESTORATION OF KING CHARLES 11. in 1660.

BY RICHARD EURTON. '

A NEW EDITION, WITH ADDITIONAL WOOD-CUT PORTRAITS, AND A COPIOUS INDEX.

WESTMINSTER:

PRINTED FOR MACHELL STACE, No. 5, MIDDLE SCOTLAND YARD,.. By George Smeeton, St. Martin's Lano, Charing Cross.

1810.

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TO THE READER.

THIS small Volume is intended for the use of those who camot go to the price of a greater : and yet would willingly be informed of those wonderful transactions and revolutions which have happened in these three Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, in this last age, and within the memory of many now living: and though it cannot be expected that a large account of every particular accident can be comprehended in this little Compendium, yet I have endeavoured, without the least passion or partiality, briefly to comprise the most considerable matters.

Now as the things here inserted are more remarkable, both for their variety and quality, than it may be ever happened at any time heretofore in so short a space; so the serious perusal and consideration thereof may be very useful and necessary for quieting the present discontents and deplorable distractions that are now amongst us; since these were the forerunners of those miserable wars, ruins, and desolations which are herein related; wherein all bonds of religion, alliance and friendship were utterly destroyed. Wherein fathers and children, kindred and acquaintance, became unnatural enemies to each other ; so that with some little variation we may apply what Lucan writes of the civil wars of Rome to England in those times.

3

Wars more than civil on the British plains
Then happened ; and England distains.
In her own bowels her victorious swords;
Where kindred hosts encounter, all accords
Of empire broke, where arm’d to impious war,
The strength of all the shaken land from far
Is met, known ensigns, ensigns to defy,
Fathers by sons, and sons by fathers die.

What fury country-men, what madness, cou'd
Move you to feast your foes with English blood,
And chuse such wars as could no triumphs yield ?
Whilst yet proud Babylon unconquer'd held.
Alas! what seas, what lands might you have ta’en,
With that blood's loss which your own hands have drawn?

Let us all therefore who pretend to the name of Christians, study to be quiet, and follow peace with all men ; which is the most effectual means to prevent those confusions and miseries which we have lately suffered, and under the effects whereof we still groan : and that this short narrative may be useful to this purpose, is the earnest and hearty desire of

Your countryman and well wisher,

RICHARD BURTON.*

It is very much doubted whether any such person as RICHARD BURTON edited the many books attributed to him, but that the editor and publisher was the same person, as appears from Dunton's remarks, in his character of Nathaniel Crouch, who published the first editions of Burton's works.

Mr. NATHANIEL Crouch, I think I have given you the very soul of his character, when I have told you that his talent lies at collection. He has melted down the best of our English Histories into Twelve-Penny-Books, which are filled with wonders, rarities, and curiosities, for you must know, his title pages are a little swelling. I have a hearty friendship for him, but he has got a habit of leering under his hat, and once made it a great part of his business, to bring down the reputation of Second Spira.”

Life of John Dunton, p. 282. Edit. 1705.

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