A new history of Great Britain: from the invasion of Julius Caesar to the present time ...

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C. Law, 1803 - Great Britain - 455 pages
 

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Page 376 - Here shift the scene, to represent How those I love, my death lament. Poor Pope will grieve a month; and Gay A week ; and Arbuthnot a day. St John himself will scarce forbear, To bite his pen, and drop a tear. The rest will give a shrug and cry I'm sorry; but we all must die.
Page 390 - The excellence of this work is not exactness, but copiousness ; particular lines are not to be regarded ; the power is in the whole ; and in the whole there is a magnificence like that ascribed to Chinese plantation, the magnificence of vast extent and endless diversity.
Page 254 - THE Lord descended from above, And bowed the heavens most high ; And underneath his feet he cast The darkness of the sky. 2 On cherub and on cherubim, Full royally he rode ; And on the wings of mighty winds Came flying all abroad.
Page 394 - I had friends who endeavoured to shake my belief in the Christian religion. I saw difficulties which staggered me ; but I kept my mind open to conviction. The evidences and doctrines of Christianity, studied with attention, made me a most firm and persuaded believer of the Christian religion. I have made it the rule of my life, and it is the ground of my future hopes.
Page 400 - ... collate manuscripts — but to dive into the depths of dungeons, to plunge into the infection of hospitals, to survey the mansions of sorrow and pain, to take the...
Page 270 - Christ was the word that spake it; He took the bread and brake it ; And what the word did make it, That I believe and take it.
Page 379 - It has been so long said as to be commonly believed, that the true characters of men may be found in their letters, and that he who writes to his friends lays his heart open before him. But the truth is, that such were the simple friendships of the "Golden Age," and are now the friendships only of children.
Page 124 - Lever a cinq, diner a neuf, Souper a cinq, coucher a neuf, Fait vivre d'ans nonante et neuf.
Page 153 - ... a coat, one half white, and the other half black or blue ; a long beard ; a silk hood buttoned under his chin, embroidered with grotesque figures of animals, dancing men, &c.
Page 370 - I have heard him frequently own with pleasure, that if he had any talent for English prose, it was owing to his having often read the writings of the great Archbishop Tillotson.

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