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THE PRESENT AND FUTURE OF THE IRISH QUESTION. By “C.”.. 89

Result of the British elections of 1885, 89; The change does not mean an imme-

diate concession of self-government to Ireland, 90; National independence in the

idea of Irish Home Rule, 91; English opinion not the only factor to be conciliated,

92; English greed of power the great obstacle to Home Rule. 93; The amount of

Home Rule that will satisfy both England and Ireland, 94; The difficulty about

the control of the police, 95 ; The concessions that England may give, 96; Eng.

land's sacrifice a very serious and material one, 97; The connection with the Em-

pire which Ireland would accept, 98 ; The material difficulties in the way may be

speedily disposed of, 99.

THE SUPERNATURAL AND INTELLECTUAL DEVELOPMENT. By F. J. Cum-

minys,

100

Vulgar confusion as to the nature and influence of religion, 100; The line of argu-

ment to be pursued in the present instance, 101; The doctrines of the modern

school and the rejection of the supernatural, 102; Inflicting injury on both philoso-

phy and literature, 103; Poets, to be great, must be Christians, 104; A picture of

medieval scholasticism, 105; But the scholastics were not faultless, 107; What is

requisite to appreciate the great mediaeval giants, 108: The lesson derived from

the proper study of poetry, 109; The poetic deitication of nature. 110; The pictures
which poetry should present to us, 111; A state of existence baffling all human in-

quiry, 113: What keeps man from being a monster, 113; The intluence of the su-

pernatural upon poetry is incalculable, 114.

A NATIONAL CATHOLIC LIBRARY. By “S.,"

115

The public and private Catholic libraries that already exist, 115; Absence of Cath-

olie books from ihe public secular libraries, 116; Caiholic books in the private

libraries of Protestants, 117; Protestant ignorance of Catholic doctrines and prac-

tices, 118; A grand central Catholic library is needed, 119; A case which especially

calls for endowments, 120; The good arising from the proposed library, 121 ; It

must have smaller local libraries to assist it, 122.

St. CYPRIAN AND THE ROMAN SEE. By Arthur H. Cullen,

123

The distorted view of St. Cyprian held by Anglicans. 123; How they come into

conflict with St. Augustine, 121; Anglicans cannot understand the grace of numil-

ity, 125; Various interpretations given by the enemies of the Papucy, 126; A thor-

oughly Anglican and illogical idea, 127; Scope of Ballerini's interpretation, 128;

Other views of the celebrated passage, 129; St. Cyprian's speech at ihe Council of

Carthage, 130; Another awkward Anglican position, 131: How the Suint speaks of

the Roman See in other passages, 132; Real meaning of the words under consider-

ation, 133 ; Consistency requires this interpretation. 134 ; The other bishops at the

Council, 135 ; The primary of St. Peter, 136; Consideration of other extracts from

St. Cyprian's writings, 137; Why he would not fall into glaring inconsistency, 138;

The leading idea in his mind, 139.

A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF FATHER ROBERT MOLYNEUX, S.J. By Rev.

William P. Treacy, S.J.,

140

Life in Philadelphia during the War of Independence, 140: Religious ministration

for the Catholic soldiers, 111; Character of Father Molyneux, 112; Distinguished

Catholic laymen then in Philadelphia, 143; The education of the youth, 141; Ar-

duous, incessant, and fruitful labors of Father Molyneux, 145; Sketch of his ca-

reer, 146; His missions after leaving Philadelphia, 147; Restoration of the Society

of Jesus, 149; Early Jesuit missionaries in Philadelphia, 150); Father Molyneux's

virtues, '151 ; His many distinguished friends, 152; H is end, 153.

A FEW WORDS MORE ON THE NEW BIBLE. By Rt. Rev. J. A. Corcoran, D.D., 154

Predictions against revision that were of no avail, 154 ; Professor Marsh's reasons

against revision, 155; But revision has come, notwithstanding, 136; Awkward

position of the American revisers, 157; Is this revision a success? 158; Some of the

sectarian dross still remains, 159 ; An example in point, 160 ; Calvin's interpretation

of St. James, 161; Catholics would not alter the text, 162: Protestant dishonesty

in regard to the text, 163; Shirking difficulties, 164; Liberalistic tendency of the

revisers, 165; Illustration by example, 166; St. Jerome and the revisers, 167; The

next revision will be done by Americans, 168.

SCIENTIFIC CHRONICLE. By Rev. J. M. Degni, S.J., .

169

Scientific education, 169; Astronomy, New star in Andromeda, 171 ; Physics and

chemistry - Electrical furnaces and the aluminium compounds, 172; Décomposi-

tion of didymium, 173; Composite photography, 174; Geology-Flood-rock explo-

sion as an artiticial earthquake, 176.

The Roman QUESTION. By Rt. Rev. James O'Connor, D.D.,.

193

Material improvements in Rome since 1870, 193 ; A well-behaved people and dull

business, 194; Excessive taxation, prison reports, the poor, 195; Î'he charities of

Rome, 196: Charities founded by the Popes, suppressed by the Piedmontese invaders,

197; The temporal power of the Pope, 198: The electoral body in Italy, 199;

Italy's present condition is very sad indeed, 200; How will the temporal power be

restored ? #1 ; Reasons why the Pope should be free, 202; He should be free in ap-

pearance as well as in fact, 203; Nature of the temporal power, 201; Political life

in Rome after 1870, 200; The outrage to the remains of Pope Pius IX., 206 ; Catho-

lics and the unity of Italy, 207: Outlook from the present state of things, 208; The

Pope's present position nothing new in history, 209.

PAGE

ART AND ARTISTS–GIORGIO VASARI. By John A. Mooney,

210

Is it art, or only a pretender.that has settled among us: 210 ; The influence of edu-

cation, 211; What a skilful historian may do for us, 212; Vasari's position among

artists, 213; The young Giorgio finds a patron. 214; Other problems than art that

he had to deal with, 215 : Vasari and the Medici, 216; After severe studies he tries

his powers, 217; He gains a position of independence in the world, 218; Some of

his works and friends, 219; Patronized by Pius V., 220); Gathering material for his

" Lives of the Painters," 221; Vasari shows us the man as well as the artist, 22:2;

His style and other characteristics, 223; His work is a guide to the study of art,

224; Michel Angelo's tribute, 225.

PRIMITIVE MAN AND His SPEECH. By Very Rev. Edward Jacker,

226

Professor Whitney on philology, 226; How he places the problem before us, 227;

His view of the cause of language-making, 228; The origin of language and the

problem of man's origin. 229; Language and the Darwinian hypothesis, 230 ; Dar-

winism not to Mr. Whitney's taste, 231 : Mere animal faculties and the production

of human speech, 232 ; Evolution and the possibility of distinctly rational speech,

233; In what condition of utterance and

voice were man's immediate progenitors?

231; Views of the Jesuit Father Pesch (footnote), 2357; Can the doctrine of creation

be reconciled with the evolution theory? 236; A possible construction of the evolu-

tionist hypothesis (footnote), 237; What creation strictly means, 2:3*; Man's primi.

tive condition in regard to language, 239; Mr. Whitney's theory intrinsically in-

consistent, 240; How the problem of the origin of language now stands in the

world of science, 241.

THE CHURCH IN CANADA UNDER THE FRENCH REGIME. By D. A. O'Sul-

livun,

242

The term establishment with reference to the Church in Canada, 242; Bearing of

the encyclical “ Immortale Dei" on :bis question, 213; The Catholic Church can:

not be established by law," 241; This term restricted to national churches, 245;

How the case of England is pertinent to the present subject, 246 ; Position of the

Church in England before Henry VIII., 247: How he changed it, 218: A compari-

son with the Church of France, 249; The Gallican declaration, 230: Ranke's view

of the case, 251; Canada's relation to the Gallican Church. 252; The two kinds of

establishments, 253 ; The ecclesiastical jurisdiction over Canada, 251: A quotation

from Parkman, 255; The Abbé Queyles and Mgr. Laval, 256; Bishop St. Vallier,

27; An exhibition of the true Gallican spirit, 258; Opposition to the Gallican or-

dinances, 260; Jurisdictional position of the See of Qirebec, 261; More evidence

against the Gallican character of the Church in Canada, 262; Examination of

particular Gallican claims, 261; Need of a history of the Church in Canada, 265.

CATHOLICITY IN ITALY. By Rev. Bernard O' Reilly, L.D. (Laval), . .. 266

A strange scene in the Roman College, 266; The clever strategy of the Pope's ene-

mies, 267; Work of the anti-Christian propagandism in Rome, 268 ; What the Pa-

pacy and the monastic life have suffered in Italy, 269; Why the Papacy should be

free, 270; Necessary characteristics of the Papacy, 271: Proof that the Pope is not

free in his own city, 272; Leo XIII. on the Temporal Sovereignty, 273; And on the

condition of Rome, 274; The kind of education given in the Italian university

schools, 275; More of the Revolutiou's work, 276; The Pope on divorce laws and

State education, 277; What the natural consequence is, 278; Ruinous state of the

Italian finances, 279: Government opposition to new appointments of bishops,

280); The law of military service for ecclesiastics, 281; The real character of Roine,

282: Anti-Christian laws on matrimony, 283; How things have changed in Italy

since 1818. 281; Cantù on Catholicity in Italy, 28.1.

LECTURES AND CATHOLIC LECTURE BUREAUS.

287

The important proportions which lecturing has recently assumed, 287; Lesson of

the passage of arms between Socrates and Phadrus, 288; The imparting of oral

teaching, 289 : The different kinds of lecturing, 290 ; Two requisite conditions for

university purposes, 291; The university extension movement in England, 292;

The financial obstruction barring the way, 293; The activity lately exhibited in
Catholic lecturing, 291; Work of the Catholic lecture bureau of St. Louis, 295; Dif-
ficulties in the way of an enterprise like this, 296; An observation upon the sub-

jects treated, 297: The positive side of this work for (atholics, :98,

THE TRADITIONAL MISREPRESENTATION OF IRELAND. By Bryan J. Clinche, 299

Hope fostered in the Irish breast by Mr. Gladstone, 299; But the paths of English

politics are dark, 300; Reason of the excessive trust of the Irish in the pledges of

foreign statesmen, 301; Consistency of the English government's policy of misrep-

resentation of Ireland, 303; Good effect of the increasing knowledge of the Irish

people, 304; It is well if the day of Irish trust in English statesmen has gone, 305.

GOD AND AGNOSTICISM. By Condé B. Pallen, Ph.D.,

306

The Spencer-Harrison controversy, 306; Mr. Spencer's notion of ideology, 307: Are

many of our conceptions truly unrepresentative? 308 ; Mr. Spencer's view of the

three systems of philosophy accounting for the origin of the universe, 309; The

hypothesis of self-creation, 310; An assumption without warrant, 311; And still

another, 312; A wide hiatus in his argument, 3313; Dean Mansel and the incon-

ceivable, 314; Mr. Spencer conceiving an absolute which is dependent, 316: Trying

to prove the inconceivability of the first cause, 317; Whence Mr. Spencer's whole

ditficulty proceeds, 318; He endeavors to demolish his own argument, 319; What

Mr. Spencer's absolute really is, 320; Mr. Harrison has decidedly the advantage

over him, 321.

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THE BRITISH EMPIRE-WHAT IT IS, AND WHAT ARE ITS RELATIONS TO

IRELAND. By Hon. John W. Johnston,

448

What the British Empire is, 448 ; Component parts of the Indian Vice-royalty, 449;

Of what the British Isles consist, 450 ; The Isle of Man, 451; The Channel Islands,

452; Other possessions in various parts of the world, 453: England taking lessons

from the l'nited States, 455; Advantageous position of British military posts, 436;

An adequate idea of the extent of the British Empire, 457; But it has no general

Constitution, 458; The Constitution, then, no bar in Ireland's way, 459; Nor even

the Articles of Union, 460; The real reason for opposition, 461.

THE CHURCH AND HER HOLYDAYS. By John Gilmary Shea, LL.D., . . 462

How we in America stand as subjects of the Kingdom of God on earth, 462; Ac-

counting for the holydays, 463 ; An excellent theory that did not work well, 464;

Former holydays in the Spanish portion of the present United States, 465; Exemp-

tion in favor of the Indians, 466; The holydays observed in the French settlements,

467; And in the British Isles and provinces, 468; The first synod of Baltimore, 469;

Cession of Louisana to the United States, 470; The Concordat with Napoleon, 471;

The due observance of holydays always a subject of concern, 472; Ruling of Plen-

ary and Provincial Councils, 174; A uniform discipline now prevails for the first

time, 474; Probable result of the suppression of festivals, 475.

DESCARTES' POSTULATE OF EXISTENCE. By R. Meade Bache,

476

How we gain access to the truths through fictions, 476; Fundamental criteria for

the validity of reasoning, 477; The skeptie's reply to the principle of contradiction,

478; Must we beg the very question of existence? 479 ; Assailants of Descartes' prin-

ciple, 480 ; The light Balmez throws on the subject, 481; Even he has to beg the

question, 483; No proposition can be framed to prove the fact of existence, 485;

The materialistic view of consciousness, 186; May the ego be eliminated? 487;

Descartes' principle is true, but inexpressible in formal terms, 488; an experience

in point had by the present writer, 489; The ego and existence are thinkable, but

noi demonstrable, 490.

THE PHILOSOPHY OF PRAYER. By Rev. M. O. Riordan,

491

Prayer as an echo of the voice of humanity, 491; In every form of religion, 492 ;

What prayer really implies, 493; Prayer is both a duty and a necessity, 494; But it

does not constitute religion, 1977; Prayer not incompatible with God's attributes,

496;. Who the opponents of prayer are. 497; Disposing of difficulties on account of

God's attributes, 498; The physical science objection is merely specious, 499 ; De.

nial of prayer's power in the physical world, 500; What happens as the result of

prayer, 301, Prayer is offered for spiritual as well as for temporal blessings, 502; Pro-

fessor Tyndall's ridiculous test, 503 ; Some reflections on it, 504.

The Russo-GREEK CHURCH. By John Charles Earle, B.A. (Oxon.), . . . 505

Dr. Palmer's visit to the Greek Church, 505; He assists at worship at St. Petersburg,

506; Origin of the Greek schism, 507; How far the Church is secularized in Russia,

548; Superstition among the Russians, 509; How Mr. Palmer joined the Greek

Church, 510; What the authorities thought of his application, 5j1; Life in a Rus.

sian monastery, 512; Religion among the Russian people, 513; A priest with bewil.

deringly vague ideas of Church unity, 514; The daily life of a Russian priest, 515;

Infidelity was then making inroads, 516; A Russian missionary to the Aleutian

Islands, 517; Cardinal Newman and the character of Palıner's narrative, 518 ; Mr.

Palmer's serious reflections in Moscow, 519; Charms of the Russian liturgy, 520;

The patriarchal library, 521; Russia's first-class monasteries, 5:22; Lutheran converts

to the Russian Church, 523 ; National characteristics, the icons, etc., 324 ; Excel-

lent character of Mr. Palmer's narrative, 525.

A GRANDDAUGHTER OF JOSEPH DE MAISTRE. By M. H. Allies, .

527

The subject of this memoir and her biographer, 527; Worthy descendants of the

great writer, 528; The De Maistres are given a French home, 529; Inscrutability of

God's ways, 530; A director indispensable in spiritual mutters, 531; Through the

ordeal of the baths, 532; Gradually bidding farewell to earth, 533 ; How the end

came to Xaverine de Maistre, 53i.

THE RAILROAD AND KINDRED MONOPOLIES. By George D. Wolf,

535

Democracy and class domination, 535; The real condition of the working classes,

536; The majority of our people are necessarily toilers, 537; The privileges and

powers of corporations, 338: The evil doings of corporations, 539 ; Stock watering,

540; Instances in point, 541; How the public are robbed, 52 ; The press also de-

moralized, 543 ; Bolstering up weak corporations, 544; An enormous tax needlessly

imposed, 545); Fictitious capitalization of anthracite coal monopolies, 546; Reme-

dies proposed to prevent it, 148; Discrimination in favor of individuals and locali-

ties, 518; The Philadelphia Gas Works, 519; The Standard Oil Company, 1570; Facts

in proof, 551; Pennsylvania not favored by her great railroad, 532; Facts that prove

this, 553; How much the State is made to lose, 555.

THE ELECTIONS IN GREAT BRITAIN AND IRISH HOME RULE, .

556

Dishonesty of the arguments against Home Rule, 556; It is a wonder the result

was not worse, 557; Noble bearing of Messrs. Gladstone and Parnell, 558; Outcome

of the electoral contest, 559; Home Rule has not experienced even a shadow of

defeat, 560; On Ireland herself depends the final result, 561.

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SCIENTIFIC CHRONICLE. By Rev. J. M. Degni, S.J., ·

562

Meteorological observations of the signal service, 562; Recent progress of the metal.

lurgy of aluminium, 565; Photographs of the solar spectruin, 567; Pasteur and

hydrophobia, 568.

NATURE WORSHIP—THE NEW RELIGION. By Very Rev. R. J. Meyer, S.J., 577

Religion not a characteristic of the modern world, 577; Avowed object of the self-

constituted leaders of modern thought, 578; Matthew Arnold betraying their se-

crets, 579: Modern science as an adversary of religion, 580; Relation of literature

to our age, 581; The modern school of culture, 582; Emerson unreasonably ad-

mired, 584 ; Uniform aim of the whole school of culture, 387; The prevalent false

views of art, 586 ; Impropriety in art works, 587: Amenability of polite society to

outside influences. 588; Evil results of Nature Worship in France, 590; Character

of French infidelity, 591 ; How people are taught to scoff at religion, 592: It is

criminal to pursue pleasure for the sake of pleasdire, 593 : How national deteriora-

tion takes place, 594 ; Effect of the want of definite religious principles, 595; The

duty which Catholics owe to society, 396.

THE MONKS AND CIVILIZATION. By Rev. Edward F. X. McSweeny, D.D., 597

The world is moved by the principled, not by principles, 597; Monks as mediators

between rulers and ruled, 698; What they did for free government in England,

599; And the same is true of other States, 600; Always abundant opportunity for

charity, 601; Apropos of an old medieval Bible, 602; Universities founded by the

monks, 603; Tributes of Maitland and Guizot, 601: The one vocation common to

ail the religious orders, 605; As to music, the monks have also made the world

their debtors, 606; Character of their editices, 607; Causes of the monks' decline

and fall, 609; Many abuses had crept into their gorernment, 610; What the worst

of these were, 611; But the Church soon heals her wounds, 612.

EDWARD HYDE AND His DAUGHTER. By R. M. Johnston,

613

English disregard for good name, 613; Character and behavior of Edward Hyde,

614; His strange conduct towards his daughter, 615; Anne Hyde's person and

character, 616; Her relations with the Duke of York, 617; Her father's dishonorable

and indecent langunge, 618; Fidelity of the Duke of York to his wife, 619; The

Chancellor's assertions as to his daughter must have been hypocritical, 620: Rapid-

ity of his rise after her marriage, 621 ; A letter of King Charles II., 622; Clarendon

in exile, 623; He dies in France neglected by his king, 621.

HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN ART. By Rev. J. F. X. O'Connor, S.J.,

625

Father Garrucci's great work,625 ; Its contents, 626; How he composed the book,

627; Nature of Christian art, 628; Religion and the beautiful, 629; Illustrations of

the true principles in art, 63); Prophetic meaning expressed in early Christian

pictures, 631; Peculiarities of some of the groups, 633: Three subjects concerning

St. Peter, 631; The maguificent treasure contained in Fr. Garrucci's volumes, 635.

IS THE CHURCH GAINING OR LOSING GROUND IN CATHOLIC COUNTRIES.

By Arthur F. Marshall, B.A. (O.con.), ...

636

Meaning of the issue here discussed, 6:36; Misapprehensions as to a gorernment's

political attitude towards the Church, 637; Relation of Catholics to political lite, 638;

asto France, its literature must be taken account of, 639 ; Positive nature ofu French-

man's character, 610; Exceptional character of the Roman question in Italy, 611;

The hostile camps in Italy as well as in France, 612; The one immense gain in all

times of persecution, 613; Reasons why non-Catholics suspect the Church to be

weukening, 614; The real strength of the Church, 615 : Increased respect for the

head of the Catholic Church, 616; Advantage of Protestants as to scandals, 647;

Proof that the Church is gaining ground, 618; A consoling conclusion drawn, 630).

RELATIVE CONDITION OF WOMAN UNDER PAGAN AND CHRISTIAN CIVI-

LIZATION. By His Emminence Cardinal Gibbons,

651

Miserable life of woman in the ancient Pagan world, 651; The Germans an exception,

according to Tacitus. 672; Domestic life in ancient Greece, 653 ; And in republican

and imperial Rome, 651; The model held up to Christian women, 655 ; Character

of the holy women of Christianity, 636; How the Church has exalted woman, 657;

Modern advocates of" woman's rights" degrade women, 6.58; Ennobling charac-

ter of the Christian law of marriage, 659; Protestants on the evils of divorce, 660) ;

Woman has not been ungrateful for the boon conferred by the Gospel, 661; Aların

ing increase of divorces in this country, 6812 ; What the effect of the present evil

tendency must be, 663; Why the mother should be the first instructor of her chil-

dren, 664 ; Advice to motbers, 665.

THE COMING CONFLICT IN THE East. By A. de G.,

666

The recent events in the Balkan peninsula, 666; Review of the Eastern question

since 1853, 667; The last Russo-Turkish war and its consequences, 668: Recent

changes in the map of Europe, 670; Geographical reasons now actuating the

Powers, 671; The sociological phase of the problem, 672; What business interests

have to do with it, 67%; The foreign policies of Russia and France, 674; The reli-

gious side of the question, 675; An "inspired ", pamphlet bearing on the issue and

on the Papacy, 676; What true statesmanshipsbould do in the case, 678; Not much

hope for the Sick Man" of Europe, 679; The interests of the various powers, 680;

Europe is on the eve of a tremendous conflict, 681.

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