The Literary souvenir; or, Cabinet of poetry and romance, ed. by A.A. Watts

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Alaric Alexander Watts
1832

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Page 112 - The maddened and the mourner may retire, To cool the spirit's fever in thy wave, And gather inspiration from thy lyre; In solemn musings, when the world is still, To woo a love less fleeting to the breast, Or lie and dream, beside the prophet-rill That resteth never, while it whispers rest ; Like Numa, cast earth's cares and crowns aside, And commune with a spiritual bride!
Page 112 - Until the yearning soul looks fondly back, To clasp them, — and they vanish, once again ; — At even, — when the fight of youth is done, And sorrow — like the " searchers of the slain", — Turns up the cold, dead faces, one by one, Of prostrate joys and wishes,— but in vain ! And finds that all is lost, — and walks around, 'Mid hopes that, each, has perished of its wound ; — Then, pale Egeria ! to thy moon-lit cave The...
Page 316 - ... gentleness; just as the presence of a born gentlewoman might have done, if it were possible to fancy a born gentlewoman seated in the tap-room of the Foaming Tankard. To say truth, the tap-room was a place that Mary seldom visited. The noise, the talking, the singing, the smell of tobacco, or even the odour of the famous Sandleford beer would have kept her from that wellfrequented resort of the thirsty souls of the village; even if the dread of encountering some of her many lovers (for Mary had...
Page 156 - First there -is white, pure unadulterated white ; then there is ' dead' white, then there is ' blue' white, then there is ' pearl' white, then there is ' French ' white, and heaven knows how many other whites. — Next follow the greys; — first there is simple grey, then ' blue 'grey, then ' ash' grey, then ' silver' grey, then ' raven" grey, and, for aught I know, a dozen other greys. — Then come the fawn, the ' light ' fawn, the ' dark ' fawn, the ' red ' fawn, the ' brown ' fawn, the
Page 109 - O'er time, where time has triumphed over art ; As wild-flowers climb its ruins, haunt it still, While still, above the consecrated spot, Lifts up its prophet voice the ancient rill, And flings its oracles along the grot. But where is she, the lady of the stream, And he, whose worship was, and is a dream ? Silent, yet full of voices ; desolate, Yet filled with memories, like a broken heart.
Page 110 - Oh ! for a vision like to his who sate With thee, and with the moon and stars, apart, By the cool fountain, many a livelong even, That speaks, unheeded, to the desert, now, When vanished clouds had left the air all heaven, And all was silent, save the stream and thou, Egeria! — solemn thought upon his brows, For all his diadem; thy spirit-eyes His only homage; and the flitting boughs And birds, alone, between him and the skies! Each outward sense expanded to a soul, And every feeling tuned into...
Page 158 - Mouchoir brode proceeded from them. It is true, that they do not require the corners to be so elaborately embroidered ; but for years have they been distinguished for the open work border on cobweb-like cambric : nor are they to be satisfied with the possession of a moderate share of these superior articles. No, indeed ; if they are to be restricted to necessaries in dress, they fully indemnify themselves by having these necessaries of the finest possible quality, and in the largest possible quantity....
Page 146 - A child no more ! a maiden now, A graceful maiden, with a gentle brow ; A cheek tinged lightly, and a dove-like eye ; And all hearts bless her, as she passes by...
Page 96 - cried the delighted girl, hanging round her own father's neck in frantic joy, — come and see him directly ! " " Not just directly, my own Lilly ! " said he composedly; — "seventy-four is no age for surprises, even joyful ones — Sir...
Page 340 - You are afraid of the stranger, whom, for the last three nights, they have observed about the grounds," said Monsieur le Croix. " What harm have we to apprehend from him ?" " What brings him here, and at night ?" " What mischief can he do, and alone ?" " He may have associates, who are at hand," said Madame le Croix, after a pause. " Did you not part in anger with Julian?" added she. " Do you think 'tis Julian?" asked Monsieur le Croix. " Julian could not meditate any injury to us," said Madame le...

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