Elements of tuition

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Page 43 - An Experiment in Education, made at the Male Asylum of Madras ; suggesting a System by which a School or Family may teach itself under the Superintendence of the Master or Parent.
Page 300 - Hence appear the many mistakes which have made learning generally so unpleasing and so unsuccessful ; first, we do amiss to spend seven or eight years merely in scraping together so much miserable Latin and Greek as might be learned otherwise easily and delightfully in one year.
Page 70 - I soon found that, if ever the school was to be brought into good order, taught according to that method and system which is essential to every public institution, it must be done either by instructing ushers in the economy of such a seminary, or by youths from among the pupils trained for the purpose. For a long time I kept both of these objects in view; but was in the end compelled, after the most painful efforts of perseverance, to abandon entirely the former, and adhere solely to the latter.
Page 149 - Beating then, and all other sorts of slavish and corporal punishments, are not the discipline fit to be used in the education of those we would have wise, good, and ingenuous men; and therefore very rarely to be applied, and that only in great occasions, and cases of extremity.
Page 89 - Compiled and set forth for the bringing up of all those that intend to attain to the knowledge of the Latin tongue.
Page 149 - The usual lazy and short way by chastisement and the rod, which is the only instrument of government that tutors generally know or ever think of, is the most unfit of any to be used in education...
Page 161 - Whereunto if afterwards there might be added the right helps of true art and learning (which helps, I must plainly confess, this age of the world, carrying the name of a learned age, doth neither much know nor...
Page 66 - ... together. The scholar ever finds his own level not only in his class, but also in the ranks of the school, being promoted or degraded from place to place, or class to class, according to his proficiency.
Page 71 - ... as to qualify him for discharging the office of a teacher of this school, I had formed a man who could earn a much higher salary, than was allowed at this charity, and on far easier terms...

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