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Poor short-lived things, what plans we lay'

Ah, why forsake our native home, To distant climates speed away?

For self sticks close where'er we roam!

Care follows hard, and soon o’ertakes

The well-rigged ship, the warlike steed; Her destined quarry ne'er forsakes;

Not the wind Aies with half her speed.

From anxious fears of future ill

Guard well the cheerful, happy Now; Gild e'en your sorrows with a smile,

No blessing is unmixed below.

Thy neighing steeds and lowing herds,

Thy numerous flocks around thee graze, And the best purple Tyre affords

Thy robe magnificent displays. On me indulgent Heaven bestowed

A rural mansion, neat and small; This lyre ;-and as for yonder crowd,

The happiness to hate them all. .

EPIGRAMS, TRANSLATED FROM THE LATIN OF OWEN

ON ONE IGNORANT AND ARROGANT

Thou mayst of double ignorance boast,
Who know'st not that thou nothing know'st.

PRUDENT SIMPLICITY

That thou mayst injure no man dove-like be,
And serpent-like that none may injure thee!

To A FRIEND IN Distress

I wish thy lot, now bad, still worse, my friend;
For when at worst, they say, things always mend.

RETALIATION

The works of ancient bards divine,

Aulus, thou scorn'st to read;
And should posterity read thine,

It would be strange indeed !

SELF-KNOWLEDGE
When little more than boy in age
I deemed myself alınost a sage;
But now seem worthier to be styled,
For ignorance, almost a child.

SUNSET AND SUNRISE

CONTEMPLATE, when the sun declines,

Thy death, with deep reflection;
And when again he rising shines,

Thy day of resurrection !

TRANSLATIONS OF GREEK VERSES

FROM THE GREEK OF JULIANUS

A SPARTAN, his companions slain,

Alone from battle fled :
His mother, kindling with disdain

That she had borne him, struck him dead :
For courage, and not birth alone,
In Sparta, testifies a son !

ON THE SAME, BY PALLADAS

A SPARTAN 'scaping from the fight,
His mother met him in his flight,
Upheld a falchion to his breast,
And thus the fugitive addressed :
Thou canst but live to blot with shame
“ Indelible thy mother's name,
“While every breath that thou shalt draw
Offends against thy country's law:
“ But, if thou perish by this hand,
“Myself indeed throughout the land,
« To my dishonour, shall be known
« The mother still of such a son;
“But Sparta will be safe and free,
“ And that shall serve to comfort me."

An EPITAPH

My name—my country-what are they to thee?
What, whether base or proud my pedigree?
Perhaps I far surpassed all other men ;
Perhaps I fell below them all; what then?
Suffice it, stranger ! that thou seest a tomb !
Thou know'st its use ; it hides- no matter whom.

ANOTHER

Take to thy bosom, gentle Earth! a swain

With much hard labour in thy service worn; He set the vines that clothe yon ample plain,

And he these olives that the vale adorn.

He filled with grain the glebe ; the rills he led

Through this green herbage, and those fruitful bowers; Thou, therefore, Earth! lie lightly on his head,

His hoary head, and deck his grave with flowers.

ANOTHER

Painter, this likeness is too strong,
And we shall mourn the dead too long.

ANOTHER

At threescore winters' end I died,

A cheerless being, sole and sad ;
The nuptial knot I never tied,

And wish my father never had.

By CALLIMACHUS

At morn we placed on his funereal bier

Young Melanippus; and at eventide, Unable to sustain a loss so dear,

By her own hand his blooming sister died.

Thus Aristippus mourned his noble race,

Annihilated by a double blow,
Nor son could hope nor daughter more to embrace,

And all Cyrene saddened at his woe.

On Miltiades
MiltiadES ! thy valour best
(Although in every region known)
The men of Persia can attest,
Taught by thyself at Marathon.

ON AN INFANT

Bewall not much, my parents ! me, the prey
Of ruthless Hades, and sepulchred here.
An infant, in my fifth scarce finished year,
He found all sportive, innocent, and gay,
Your young Callimachus; and if I knew
Not many joys, my griefs were also few.

By HERACLIDES

In Cnidus born, the consort I became
Of Euphron. Aretimias was my name.
His bed I shared, nor proved a barren bride,
But bore two children at a birth, and died.
One child I leave to solace and uphold
Euphron hereafter, when infirm and old,
And one, for his remembrance sake, I bear
To Pluto's realm, till he shall join me there.

ON THE REED

I was of late a barren plant,
Useless, insignificant,
Nor fig, nor grape, nor apple bore,
A native of the marshy shore;
But, gathered for poetic use,
And plunged into a sable juice,
Of which my modicum I sip
With narrow mouth and slender lip,
At once, although by nature dumb,
All eloquent I have become,
And speak with fluency untired,
As if by Phæbus' self inspired.

To HEALTH

Eldest born of powers divine !
Blest Hygeia! be it mine
To enjoy what thou canst give,
And henceforth with thee to live:

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