The Vision of Dante Alighieri: Or, Hell, Purgatory and Paradise

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J.M. Dent & Company, 1910 - Poetry - 451 pages

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Page ii - TRAVEL ? SCIENCE * FICTION THEOLOGY & PHILOSOPHY HISTORY ? CLASSICAL FOR YOUNG PEOPLE ESSAYS * ORATORY POETRY & DRAMA BIOGRAPHY REFERENCE ROMANCE THE ORDINARY EDITION IS BOUND IN CLOTH WITH GILT DESIGN AND COLOURED TOP.
Page 1 - IN the midway * of this our mortal life, I found me in a gloomy wood, astray Gone from the path direct ; and e'en to tell, It were no easy task, how savage wild That forest, how robust and rough its growth, Which to remember only, my dismay Renews, in bitterness not far from death.
Page 175 - Now was the hour that wakens fond desire In men at sea, and melts their thoughtful heart Who in the morn have bid sweet friends farewell, And pilgrim newly on his road with love Thrills, if he hear the vesper bell from far, 5 That seems to mourn for the expiring day...
Page 46 - In brief, we all are monsters; that is, a composition of man and beast, wherein we must endeavour to be as the poets fancy that wise man Chiron, that is, to have the region of man above that of beast, and sense to sit but at the feet of reason.
Page 144 - Now late on the sabbath day, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week, came Mary Magdalene and the other Mary to see the sepulchre.
Page 4 - For every vein and pulse throughout my frame She hath made tremble." He, soon as he saw That I was weeping, answer'd, " Thou must needs Another way pursue, if thou wouldst 'scape From out that savage wilderness. This beast, At whom thou criest, her way will suffer none To pass, and no less hindrance makes than death : So bad and so accursed in her kind, That never sated is her ravenous will, Still after food P more craving than before.
Page 18 - If thou art bent to know the primal root, From whence our love gat being, I will do As one, who weeps and tells his tale. One day, For our delight we read of Lancelot, How him love thrall'd.
Page 108 - With these few words I sharpen'd for the voyage The mind of my associates, that I then Could scarcely have withheld them. To the dawn Our poop we turn'd, and for the witless flight Made our oars wings, still gaining on the left. Each star of the other pole night now beheld, And ours so low, that from the ocean floor It rose not.
Page 141 - Of th' other two, Whose heads are under, from the murky jaw Who hangs, is Brutus :* lo ! how he doth writhe • And speaks not. The other, Cassius, that appears So large of limb. But night now reascends; And it is time for parting. All is seen.

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