Geological Magazine

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Henry Woodward
Cambridge University Press, 1879 - Geology
 

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Page 565 - NICHOLSON. A Manual of Zoology, for the use of Students. With a General Introduction on the Principles of Zoology. By HENRY ALLEYNE NICHOLSON, MD, D.Sc., FLS, FGS, Regius Professor of Natural History in the University of Aberdeen.
Page 79 - The Carucata, which is also to be interpreted the plough-land, was as much arable as could be managed with one plough and the beasts belonging thereto in a year ; having meadow, pasture, and houses for the house-holders and cattle belonging to it...
Page 33 - Florence of Worcester says : — "On the third day of the nones of Nov. 1099, the sea came out upon the shore, and buried towns and men very many, and oxen and sheep innumerable.
Page 58 - Thus there cannot be the shadow of a doubt as to the length of time which must have elapsed between the close of the Upper Silurian and the commencement of the Carboniferous Period, and of the greatness of the work accomplished in that time.
Page 46 - By JW Davis, Esq., FGS The author described some fossil remains of fish obtained from the bone-bed immediately above the " Better-bed Coal " referred to by him in a former paper (see QJGS vol. xxxii. p. 332). The fossils described included Ichthyodorulites belonging to 4 species, namely : — Pleurodus affinit, a species named, but not described or figured by Agassiz ; Hoplonehus elegans, gen.
Page 381 - On the Cambrian (Sedgw.) and Silurian beds of the Dee Valley, as compared with those of the Lake-district.
Page 156 - The trunks of the trees gradually decay until they are converted into a blackish-brown substance resembling peat, but which still retains more or less of the fibrous structure of the wood ; and layers of this often alternate with layers of clay and sand, the whole being penetrated, to the depth of four or five yards or more, by the long fibrous roots of the willows.
Page 30 - because the lands covered by seas were originally at different altitudes, that the waters have risen, or subsided, or receded from some parts and inundated others. But the reason is, that the same land is sometimes raised up and sometimes depressed, and the sea also is simultaneously raised and depressed, so that it either overflows or returns into its own place again.
Page 46 - Turbinarias (2); Tabulata (1). The paper concluded with remarks on the genera and species represented, from which it appeared that the Coral fauna of Haldon is the northern expression of that of the French and Central European deposits, which are the equivalents of the British Upper Greensand. The Haldon deposit was formed in shallow water, and the corals grew upon the rolled debris of the age. 2. " Notes on Pleurodon affinis, sp. iued., Agassiz, and description of three spines of Cestracionts from...
Page 30 - ... at different altitudes, that the waters have risen, or subsided, or receded from some parts and inundated others. But the reason is, that the same land is sometimes raised up and sometimes depressed, and the sea also is simultaneously raised and depressed, so that it either overflows or returns into its own place again. We must, therefore, ascribe the cause to the ground, either to that ground which is under the sea, or to that which becomes flooded by it, but rather to that which lies beneath...

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