The Cambridge History of English Literature: From Steele and Addison to Pope and Swift

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Sir Adolphus William Ward, Alfred Rayney Waller
The University Press, 1912 - English literature - 609 pages
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Page 285 - Some truths there are so near and obvious to the mind that a man need only open his eyes to see them. Such I take this important one to be, viz. that all the choir of heaven and furniture of the earth, in a word all those bodies which compose the mighty frame of the world, have not any subsistence without a mind...
Page 85 - But touch me, and no minister so sore. Whoe'er offends, at some unlucky time Slides into verse, and hitches in a rhyme, Sacred to ridicule his whole life long, And the sad burthen of some merry song.
Page 302 - ... the nearer we search into human nature, the more we shall be convinced, that the moral virtues are the political offspring which flattery begot upon pride.
Page 172 - Can I forget the dismal night, that gave My soul's best part for ever to the grave ? How silent did his old companions tread, By midnight lamps, the mansions of the dead, Through breathing statues, then unheeded things, Through rows of warriors, and through walks of kings...
Page 123 - He gave the little wealth he had, To build a house for fools and mad: And showed by one satiric touch, No nation wanted it so much: That kingdom he hath left his debtor, I wish it soon may have a better.
Page 102 - ... instead of dirt and poison, we have rather chosen to fill our hives with honey and wax ; thus furnishing mankind with the two noblest of things, which are sweetness and light.
Page 103 - I hate and detest that animal called man, although I heartily love John, Peter, Thomas, and so forth.
Page 313 - Law's Serious Call to a Holy Life,' expecting to find it a dull book (as such books generally are), and perhaps to laugh at it. But I found Law quite an overmatch for me ; and this was the first occasion of my thinking in earnest of religion, after I became capable of rational inquiry'.
Page 120 - STELLA this day is thirty-four, (We sha'n't dispute a year or more :) However, Stella, be not troubled, Although thy size and years are doubled Since first I saw thee at sixteen, The brightest virgin on the green ; So little is thy form declined ; Made up so largely in thy mind.

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