The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri: Hell, Purgatory, Paradise

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Page 427 - In that abyss Of radiance, clear and lofty, seem'd, methought, Three orbs of triple hue, dipt in one bound : And, from another, one reflected seem'd, As rainbow is from rainbow : and the third Seem'd fire, breathed equally from both. O speech ! How feeble and how faint art thou, to give Conception birth.
Page 141 - Now had they waken'd ; and the hour drew near When they were wont to bring us food; the mind Of each misgave him through his dream, and I Heard at its outlet underneath lock'd up The horrible tower: whence, uttering not a word, I look'd upon the visage of my sons.
Page 25 - By one so deep in love, then he, who ne'er From me shall separate, at once my lips All trembling kiss'd. The book and writer both Were love's purveyors. In its leaves that day We read no more.
Page 5 - In the midway of this our mortal life, I found me in a gloomy wood, astray Gone from the path direct: and e'en to tell, It were no easy task, how savage wild That forest, how robust and rough its growth, 5 Which to remember only, my dismay Renews, in bitterness not far from death.
Page 14 - Here sighs, with lamentations and loud moans, Resounded through the air pierced by no star, That e'en I wept at entering. Various tongues, Horrible languages, outcries of woe, Accents of anger, voices deep and hoarse, With hands together smote that swell'd the sounds, Made up a tumult, that for ever whirls Round through that air with solid darkness stain'd, Like to the sand that in the whirlwind flies.
Page 24 - The land, that gave me birth, Is situate on the coast, where Po descends To rest in ocean with his sequent streams. "Love, that in gentle heart is quickly learnt, Entangled him by that fair form, from me Ta'en in such cruel sort, as grieves me still: Love, that denial takes from none beloved, Caught me with pleasing him so passing well, That, as thou seest, he yet deserts me not. Love brought us to one death: CaVna waits The soul, who spilt our life.
Page 129 - attentively regard Adamo's woe. When living, full supply Ne'er lack'd me of what most I coveted; One drop of water now, alas ! I crave. The rills, that glitter down the grassy slopes Of Casentino, making fresh and soft The banks whereby they glide to Arno's stream, Stand ever in my view...
Page 23 - By pity, well-nigh in amaze my mind Was lost ; and I began : " Bard ! willingly I would address those two together coming, Which seem so light before the wind.
Page 114 - Joy seized us straight; But soon to mourning changed. From the new land A whirlwind sprung, and at her foremost side Did strike the vessel. Thrice it whirl'd her round With all the waves; the fourth time lifted up The poop, and sank the prow: so fate decreed: And over us the booming billow closed.
Page 7 - And art thou then that Virgil, that well-spring, From which such copious floods of eloquence Have issued ? " I with front abash'd replied. " Glory and light of all the tuneful train ! May it avail me, that I long with zeal Have sought thy volume, and with love immense Have conn'd it o'er. My master thou, and guide 1 Thou he from whom alone I have derived That style, which for its beauty into fame Exalts me. See the beast, from whom I fled. O save me from her, thou illustrious sage ! For every vein...

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