Charing cross, a monthly magazine of general literature. New ser., ed. by W.J. Morgan, Volume 1

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W J Morgan
1874
 

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Page 427 - Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit: and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not.
Page 130 - ... it ; for these winding and crooked courses are the goings of the serpent, which goeth basely upon the belly and not upon the feet. There is no vice that doth so cover a man with shame as to be found false and perfidious.
Page 176 - This night shall be born Our heavenly king. "He neither shall be born In housen nor in hall, Nor in the place of Paradise, But in an ox's stall. "He neither shall be clothed In purple nor in pall, But all in fair linen, As were babies all. "He neither shall be rocked In silver nor in gold, But in a wooden cradle, That rocks on the mould. "He neither shall be christened In white wine nor red, But with fair spring water, With which we were christened.
Page 130 - ... the belly, and not upon the feet. There is no vice that doth so cover a man with shame as to be found false and perfidious. And therefore...
Page 573 - When it shall please God to bring thee to man's estate, use great providence and circumspection in choosing thy wife ; for from thence will spring all thy future good or evil. And it is an action of thy life like unto a stratagem of war, wherein a man can err but once.
Page 427 - Reading maketh a full man, conference a ready man, and writing an exact man. And therefore if a man write little he had need have a great memory: if he confer little he had need have a present wit, and if he read little he had need have much cunning to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise, poets witty, the mathematics subtle, natural philosophy deep, moral grave, logic and rhetoric able to contend...
Page 133 - ARETHUSA arose From her couch of snows In the Acroceraunian mountains, — From cloud and from crag, With many a jag, Shepherding her bright fountains. She leapt down the rocks, With her rainbow locks Streaming among the streams; — Her steps paved with green The downward ravine Which slopes to the western gleams: And gliding and springing She went, ever singing, In murmurs as soft as sleep; The earth seemed to love her, And Heaven smiled above her, As she lingered towards the deep.
Page 179 - the acquainting ourselves with the best that has been known and said in the world, and thus with the history of the human spirit.
Page 47 - In the midst of this struggle and anxiety she was taken ill with a cold. Nothing was thought of it at first ; but she grew rapidly worse, and fell into a consumption. I cannot tell you what I suffered. The ills that I have undergone in this life, have been dealt out to me drop by drop, and I have tasted all their bitterness. I saw her fade rapidly away ; beautiful, and more beautiful, and more angelical to the very last.
Page 573 - HE that hath wife and children hath given hostages to fortune ; for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief. Certainly the best works, and of greatest merit for the public, have proceeded from the unmarried or childless men ; which both in affection and means have married and endowed the public.

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