The constitution of England: in which it is compared both with the republican form of government, and the other monarchies in Europe

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Printed for the proprietors of the English Classics, by J. F. Dove, 1826 - Constitutional history - 304 pages
 

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Page 66 - That the freedom of speech, and debates or proceedings in Parliament, ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of Parliament.
Page 63 - Will you solemnly promise and swear to govern the people of this kingdom of England, and the dominions thereto belonging, according to the statutes in parliament agreed on, and the laws and customs of the same? — The king or queen shall say, I solemnly promise so to do.
Page 47 - AN ACT DECLARING THE RIGHTS AND LIBERTIES OF THE SUBJECT, AND SETTLING THE SUCCESSION OF THE CROWN.
Page 178 - second, having endeavoured to subvert the constitution of " the kingdom, by breaking the original contract between " king and people — and, by the advice of Jesuits and other " wicked persons, having violated the fundamental laws, " and having withdrawn himself out of this kingdom — has " abdicated the government, and that the throne is thereby
Page 114 - These pitiful evasions gave rise to the statute 16 Car. I. c. 10. 8. whereby it is enacted, that if any person be committed by the king himself in person, or by his privy council, or by any of the members thereof, he shall have granted unto him, without any delay upon any pretence whatsoever, a writ of habeas corpus...
Page 115 - Guernsey. 9. That no inhabitant of England (except persons contracting, or convicts praying, to be transported; or having committed some capital offence in the place to which they are sent) shall be sent prisoner to Scotland, Ireland, Jersey, Guernsey, or any places beyond the seas, within or without the king's dominions; on pain that the party committing, his advisers, aiders, and assistants, shall forfeit to the party aggrieved a sum not less than 500Z.
Page 128 - But here we must observe a difference between the legislative and the executive powers. The latter may be confined, and even is the more easily so, when undivided: the legislative, on the contrary, in order to its being restrained, should absolutely be divided. For, whatever laws it may make to restrain itself, they never can be, relatively to it...
Page 115 - That every person committed for treason or felony shall, if he requires it the first week of the next term, or the first day of the next session of oyer and terminer...
Page 212 - That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed; nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.
Page 115 - Act, and signed by the person awarding them. 3. That the writ shall be returned, and the prisoner brought up within a limited time according to the distance, not exceeding in any case twenty days. 4. That officers and keepers neglecting to make due returns, or not delivering to the prisoner or his agent within six hours after demand a copy of the warrant of commitment, or shifting the custody of...

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