Lectures and Essays

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Page 118 - Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
Page 279 - What's in a name ? that which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet ; So Romeo would, were he not Romeo call'd. Retain that dear perfection which he owes Without that title. Romeo, doff thy name, And for that name which is no part of thee Take all myself.
Page 117 - These earthly godfathers of heaven's lights That give a name to every fixed star Have no more profit of their shining nights Than those that walk and wot not what they are. Too much to know is to know nought but fame ; And every godfather can give a name.
Page 141 - With them I take delight in weal And seek relief in woe ; And while I understand and feel How much to them I owe, My cheeks have often been bedew'd With tears of thoughtful gratitude.
Page 142 - My hopes are with the Dead ; anon My place with them will be, And I with them shall travel on Through all Futurity; Yet leaving here a name, I trust, That will not perish in the dust.
Page 118 - Idleness is a disease which must be combated ; but I would not advise a rigid adherence to a particular plan of study. I myself have never persisted in any plan for two days together. A man ought to read just as inclination leads him ; for what he reads as a task will do him little good. A young man should read five hours in a day, and so may acquire a great deal of knowledge.
Page 316 - For who, to dumb forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing, anxious being e'er resigned, Left the warm precincts of the cheerful day, Nor cast one longing, lingering look behind...
Page 158 - But if any provide not for his own, and specially for those of his own house, he hath denied the faith, and is worse than an infidel.
Page 121 - Either preach through their noses, or go upon missions. In this way our hero got safely to College, Where he bolted alike both his commons and knowledge ; A reading-machine, always wound up and going, He mastered whatever was not worth the knowing...
Page 30 - melior natura;" which courage is manifestly such as that creature, without that confidence of a better nature than his own, could never attain. So man, when he resteth and assureth himself upon divine protection and favour, gathereth a force and faith, which human nature in itself could not obtain...

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