Interesting Anecdotes, Memoirs, Allegories, Essays, and Poetical Fragments,: Tending to Amuse the Fancy, and Inculcate Morality, Volume 2

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author., 1797 - Anecdotes - 304 pages
 

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Page 115 - Is it for thee the lark ascends and sings? Joy tunes his voice, joy elevates his wings. Is it for thee the linnet pours his throat? Loves of his own and raptures swell the note.
Page 75 - Why, why was I born a man and yet see the sufferings of wretches I cannot relieve! Poor houseless creatures! the world will give you reproaches but will not give you relief.
Page 6 - If gratitude is due from man to man, how much more from man to his Maker ? The Supreme Being does not only confer upon us those bounties, which proceed more immediately from his hand, but even those benefits which are conveyed to us by others. Every blessing we enjoy, by what means soever it may be derived upon us, is the gift of Him who is the great Author of good, and Father of mercies.
Page 211 - ... with his views of an hereafter. In a word, his hopes are full of immortality, his schemes are large...
Page 109 - Whatever we enjoy is purely a free gift from our Creator ; but that we enjoy no more can never sure be deemed an injury, or a just reason to question his infinite benevolence. All our happiness is owing to his goodness; but that it is no greater is owing only to ourselves, that is, to our not having any inherent right to any happiness, or even to any existence at all.
Page 212 - He supersedes every little prospect of gain and advantage which offers itself here, if he does not find it consistent with his views of an hereafter. In a word, his hopes are full of immortality, his schemes...
Page 285 - The seas that roll unnumber'd waves; The wood that spreads its shady leaves ; The field whose ears conceal the grain, The yellow treasure of the plain ; All of these, and all I see...
Page 210 - Discretion is the perfection of reason, and a guide to us in all the duties of life : Cunning is a kind of instinct, that only looks out after our immediate interest and welfare.
Page 38 - Were they to give us in their catalogue of such worthies as are now living, how different would it be from that which any of our own species would draw up ! We are dazzled with the splendour of titles, the ostentation of learning, the noise of victories...
Page 11 - tis eafy to defcry She wants affiftance more than I ; Yet Teems to feel my pains alone, And is a Stoic in her own. When, among fcholars, can we find So foft and yet fo firm a mind...

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