A century of anecdote from 1760 to 1860, Volume 1

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R. Bentley, 1864 - Anecdotes

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Page xii - I wondered to hear him say of Gulliver's Travels, ' When once you have thought of big men and little men it is very easy to do all the rest.
Page 36 - We read The Vicar of Wakefield in youth and in age ; we return to it again and again, and bless the memory of an author who contrives so well to reconcile us to human nature.
Page 68 - John Keats, who was killed off by one critique, Just as he really promised something great, If not intelligible, without Greek Contrived to talk about the gods of late, Much as they might have been supposed to speak. Poor fellow! His was an untoward fate; 'T is strange the mind, that very fiery particle, Should let itself be snuffed out by an article.
Page viii - ... but, said Savage, he knows not any love but that of the sex; he was perhaps never in cold water in his life; and he indulges himself in all the luxury that comes within his reach.
Page 79 - When we retired to tea we found the Comptroller. In introducing him to Wordsworth I forgot to say who he was. After a little time the Comptroller looked down, looked up, and said to Wordsworth, "Don't you think, sir, Milton was a great genius?" Keats looked at me, Wordsworth looked at the Comptroller. Lamb, who was dozing by the fire, turned round and said, "Pray, sir, did you say Milton was a great genius?
Page 170 - Mr. Wesley and I lay on the floor; he had my greatcoat for his pillow, and I had Burkitt's ' Notes on the New Testament ' for mine. After being here near three weeks, one morning about three o'clock, Mr. Wesley turned over, and, finding me awake, clapped me on the side, saying: 'Brother Nelson, let us be of good cheer; I have one whole side yet, for the skin is off but on one side.
Page 120 - The idea propounded to me, was, that the monthly something should be a vehicle for certain plates to be executed by MR. SEYMOUR ; and there was a notion, either on the part of that admirable humorous artist, or of my visitor, that a
Page 35 - It is made up of incongruous parts. The village in its happy days is a true English village. The village in its decay is an Irish village. • The felicity and the misery which Goldsmith has brought close together belong to two different countries, and to two different stages in the progress of societ}'. He had assuredly never seen in his native island such a rural paradise, such a seat of plenty, content, and tranquillity, as his
Page 222 - If any person be desirous of having an adequate idea of the mischievous effects which have been produced in this country by the French Revolution, and all its attendant horrors, he should attempt some legislative reform, on humane arid liberal principles.
Page 120 - Boz," my signature in the Morning Chronicle, appended to the monthly cover of this book, and retained long afterwards, was the nickname of a pet child, a younger brother, whom I had dubbed Moses, in honor of the Vicar of Wakefield ; which being facetiously pronounced through the nose, became Boses, and being shortened, became Boz. " Boz " was a very familiar household word to me, long before I was an author, and so I came to adopt it.

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