The Spy, a periodical paper of literary amusement and instruction [by J. Hogg]., Issue 1

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Page 402 - A blank, my lord : She never told her love, But let concealment, like a worm i' the bud, Feed on her damask cheek : she pined in thought ; And, with a green and yellow melancholy, She sat like patience on a monument, Smiling at grief.
Page 332 - Revere the man whose PILGRIM marks the road, And guides the PROGRESS of the soul to God. 'Twere well with most, if books that could engage Their childhood pleased them at a riper age ; The man, approving what had charm'd the boy, Would die at last in comfort, peace, and joy, And not with curses on his heart, who stole The gem of truth from his unguarded soul.
Page 106 - I shall here define it to be a conceit arising from the use of two words that agree in the sound, but differ in the sense. The only way therefore to try a piece of wit, is to translate it into a different language. If it bears the test, you may pronounce it true ; but if it vanishes in the experiment, you may conclude it to have been a pun.
Page 28 - Thou know'st it well, — nor fen, nor sedge, Pollute the pure lake's crystal edge ; Abrupt, and sheer, the mountains sink At once upon the level brink ; And just a trace of silver sand Marks where the water meets the land. Far in the mirror, bright and blue, Each hill's huge outline you may view...
Page 282 - Cleugh, beneath the solemn arch of tall, thick, embowering trees, listening to the amusing lull of the many steep, moss-grown cascades, while deep, divine contemplation, the genius of the place, prompts each swelling awful thought.
Page 236 - The seasons thus, As ceaseless round a jarring world they roll, Still find them happy ; and consenting Spring Sheds her own rosy garlands on their heads : Till evening comes at last, serene and mild, When, after the long vernal day of life, Enamour'd more, as more remembrance swells With many a proof of recollected love, Together...
Page 343 - In all her length far winding lay, With promontory, creek, and bay, And islands that, empurpled bright, Floated amid the livelier light, And mountains, that like giants stand, To sentinel enchanted land.
Page 206 - Or redeem form or fame from the merciless surge; But the white foam of waves shall thy winding-sheet be, And winds, in the midnight of winter, thy dirge! On a bed of green sea-flowers thy limbs shall be laid, — Around thy white bones...
Page 206 - On beds of green sea-flower thy limbs shall be laid, Around thy white bones the red coral shall grow; Of thy fair yellow locks threads of amber be made, And every part suit to thy mansion below. Days, months, years, and ages shall circle away, And still the vast waters above thee shall roll ; Earth loses thy pattern for ever and aye — O, sailor boy ! sailor boy ! peace to thy soul ! 69.
Page 282 - I walk in spirit, and disport in its beloved gloom. This country I am in, is not very entertaining ; no variety but that of woods, and them we have in abundance ; but where is the living stream ? the airy mountain ? and the hanging rock ? with twenty other things that elegantly please the lover of nature.

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