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Lizards. A. Murray, The Geographical Distribution of Animals. London, 1866. G. R. Gray, The Genera of Birds, 3 vols. 4to.; and Catalogues of Birds, published by the Trustees of the British Museum. Montagu, Ornithological Dictionary. London, 1866. Jerdon, Birds of India. 3 vols. Calcutta, 1862-64. Günther, British Museum Catalogues of Fishes, vols. i-viii, and of the Batrachia Salientia. Couch, Fishes of the British Islands. London, 1862-65. Müller, On Ganoid Fishes, in Trans. Acad. Sci. Berlin, 1844. English Trans. in Taylor's Scientific Memoirs,

vol. iv. pp. 499-543. Invertebrata—Savigny, Mémoires sur les Animaux sans Vertébres.

2 Parts. Paris, 1816. Strauss-Durckheim, Considérations générales sur l’Anatomie comparée des Animaux Articulés. 4to. Paris, 1823. Dana, The Crustacea of the United States' Exploring Expedition, with folio Atlas of Plates. Philadelphia, 1852. Baird, British Entomostraca (Ray Society). 8vo. London, 1850. Darwin, Monograph on Cirripedia (Ray Society), 2 vols., 8vo. 1851 and 1854; and on Fossil Cirripedia, 2 vols., 4to. 1851 and 1854 (Paläontogr. Soc.). Packard, Guide to the Study of Insects. 2nd edition. Salem, 1870 (including recent and fossil groups). Westwood, Introduction to Mod. Classif. of Insects. London, 1839-40. Kirby, Monographia Apum Angliae. 2 vols. Ipswich, 1802. Blackwall, British Spiders (Ray Society). Fol. Lond., 1861. Woodward, Manual of Mollusca. Lond., 1866. Forbes and Hanley, History of British Mollusca. 4 vols. London, 1853. Lovell Reeve, Conchologia Systematica. 4to. London, 1841. Mrs. Gray, Figures of Molluscous Animals. 5 vols. 8vo. London, 1857. Semper, Reisen in Archipel der Philippinen (1) Holothurien, (2) Landmollusken, (3) Phyllobranchidæ, 1871, (4) Æolidien, 1870. Leipzig, 1868-71. Alder and Hancock, Monograph of Nudibranchiate Mollusca (Ray Society). Lond., 1845. Lacaze Duthiers, Histoire Naturelle du Corail. 8vo. Paris, 1864. Forbes, On Naked-eyed Medusæ. 4to. London, 1848. Cobbold, On Entozoa. London, 1864, and Suppl. 1869. Greene, Manuals

of Coelenterata, Lond., 1861, and Protozoa, Lond., 1863. b and c-Sir Charles Bell, Bridgewater Treatise on the Hand.

London, 1833. Strickland and Melville, The Dodo and its Kindred. London, 1848. Van der Hoeven, Recherches sur l'Hist. Nat. des Limules. Fol. Leyden, 1838. Owen, Memoir on Limulus—Trans. Linn. Soc. 1872. Lyonnet, Traité anatomique de la Chenille, &c., 4to. La Haye, 1762 ; also his posthumous memoirs published by De Haan, including the Pupa and Imago of Cossus. 4to. Paris, 1832. Chabrier, Sur le Vol des Insectes. 4to. Paris, 1823. Schiödte, On Structure of Mouth of Crustacea, in Kroyer's Naturhistorisk Tidsskrift, Ser. iii. vol. iv, translated in Annals of Nat. History, January 1868.

D. BOTANY. Candidates offering Botany will be required to show a thorough acquaintance with the following subjects:

1. Structural and Physiological Botany, together with dissections and descriptions of preparations, illustrating the minute structure and organs of plants.

2. The Principles of Systematic Botany, with a knowledge of the leading characters of the more important Natural Orders.

3. Of Geographical and Geological Botany, so much as is contained, for example, in Henfrey's 'Elementary Course' (2nd ed.), or in Balfour's • Manual of Botany."

4. The technical description of specimens of plants.
The following Books are provisionally recommended :-Henfrey, Ele-

mentary Course of Botany, 2nd ed., by Dr. Masters. London.
Balfour, Manual of Botany, last ed. Edinburgh. Asa Gray, The
Botanical Text-Book, last ed. New York. Bentley, Manual of
Botany, 2nd ed. London, 1870. P. Duchartre, Éléments de
Botanique. Paris, 1867. Emm. Le Maout et J. Decaisne, Traité
Général de Botanique. Paris. In course of translation. Berkeley,
Cryptogamic Botany. London, 1857. Julius Sachs, Lehrbuch
der Botanik. Leipzig, 1870. Lindley, Vegetable Kingdom,
London, 1853. Lindley, Descriptive Botany. London.

6. Honour School of Jurisprudence.

1. GENERAL REGULATIONS. 1. The Examination in the School of Jurisprudence shall always include

(1) General Jurisprudence;
(2) The History of English Law;
(3) Such departments of Roman Law, and (if the Board of

Studies shall think fit) such departments of English
Law, as may be specified from time to time by the

Board;
(4) International Law, or some department of it specified

by the Board of Studies. This may be omitted by Candidates who do not aim at a place in the First or

Second Class. 2. The Board of Studies may include in the Examination, either as necessary or as optional, other subjects which they may

deem suitable to be studied in connection with Jurisprudence; and may, if they shall judge it advisable, require that Candidates who have not been classed in any other School shall take in additional books or subjects, or produce evidence of having been previously examined in such additional books or subjects. The Board may prescribe books or portions of books in any language.

3. Subject to such regulations as the Board may make from time to time, select portions of Historical study, approved by the Board of Historical Studies, may be substituted by Candidates for portions of Legal study; provided that no Candidate shall be allowed to offer in the School of Jurisprudence any select portion, whether of Legal or Historical study, which he has already offered in the School of Modern History.

2. REGULATIONS OF THE BOARD OF STUDIES.

1. GENERAL JURISPRUDENCE. Candidates are recommended to read Austin on Jurisprudence, Third Edition (Campbell's), 1869.

Vol. i. Omitting Lectures II, III, IV.

Vol. ii. Lectures XLVI-LII, omitting all the rest. Also Bentham's · Theory of Legislation,' translated from the French of Etienne Dumont (London, Trübner), omitting in Principles of the Civil Code,' Part III, ch. 5; in Principles of the Penal Code,' Parts II and IV.

2. HISTORY OF ENGLISH Law. (a) History of Constitutional Law. The following Statutes should be carefully studied :-Constitutions

of Clarendon. Magna Carta. Statute of Westminster II, 13 Ed. I, c. 24. Petition of Right. Habeas Corpus Act, 31 Car. II, c. 2. Bill of Rights, 1 W. & M. st. 2. 2. Act of Settlement, 12 &

13 Will. III, C. 2. Candidates will be expected to be acquainted with the present constitution of Parliament and of the Courts of Justice.

The history of Constitutional Law may be read in the following books :- Mr. Stubbs' • Select Charters Illustrative of English History (the original documents, with the notes and introductions, should be consulted and referred to on the more important points rather than minutely studied); Blackstone's Commentaries, Book I, chaps. 2 to 13 inclusive, or Stephen's Commentaries, Book IV, Part 1, Book V, chaps. 3 to 6 inclusive. Reference may also be made to the chapters on the English Constitution in Hallam's Middle Ages, and to Hallam's Constitutional History.

It will be observed that the above-mentioned books are specified in order to indicate to students the sources from which a knowledge of the subject may be obtained, but that the books as such will not form part of the Examination. (6) History of the Law of Real Property. The following Statutes should be carefully studied :- Magna Carta,

Statute of Merton, 20 Hen. III, C. 4. De Religiosis, 7 Ed. I. De Donis Conditionalibus, 13 Ed. I, c. 1. Quia Emptores, 18 Ed. I, c. 1. 15 Richard II, c. 5. Statute of Uses and Wills. 27 Hen. VIII, c. 10, s. 1. Statute of Enrolments, 27 Hen. VIII. c. 16. Statutes of Wills, 32 Hen. VIII, c. 1, and 34 & 35 Hen. VIII, c. 5. Act for the Abolition of Feudal Tenures, 12. Car.

II, c. 24. The history of the Law of Real Property may be read in Blackstone's Commentaries, Book II, or Stephen's Commentaries, Vol. I, Book II, Part I. Williams on the Law of Real Property may also be referred to.

N.B.-If the original text of Blackstone be read either for the history of Constitutional Law or for the history of the Law of Real Property (which is recommended), some other book, such as Stephen's Commentaries, should be consulted for the principal changes in the law down to the present time.

Candidates will not be expected to show a minute acquaintance with the details of the Law of Real Property as it stands, but to possess a general knowledge of the principles which are of the greatest practical importance at the present day, of the leading historical changes it has undergone, and of the relation of those changes to the general history of England. 3. Roman Law.

The Commentaries of Gaius. The Institutes of Justinian. 4. INTERNATIONAL LAW. Until Easter Term 1874, inclusive, Candidates will be examined in

(a) The General History of International Law anterior to 1750.
(6) The Law respecting the Sea, Ships, and Navigable Rivers in

time of peace. They may consult and refer to Wheaton's History of International Law, and either of the following books; viz. Twiss's International Law, or Woolsey's Introduction to International Law. On subject (6) the Second Book of Ortolan's Diplomatie de la Mer may be studied with advantage.

In Michaelmas Term 1874, and until further notice, the following subjects will be substituted for those mentioned above under this head, viz. :

(a) The General History of International Law from the Peace of Westphalia until the present time.

(6) The Rights and Duties of Neutrals.

7. Honour School of Modern History,

1. GENERAL REGULATIONS. 1. The Examination in the School of Modern History shall always include

(1) The continuous History of England;
(2) General History during some period, selected by the

Candidate from periods to be named from time to time

by the Board of Studies; (3) A special portion of History or a special Historical

subject, carefully studied with reference to original

authorities. 2. Every Candidate shall be required to have a knowledge of Political Economy, of Constitutional Law, and of Political and Descriptive Geography.

3. A subject or period of Literature may also be added as an optional subject.

4. Candidates proposing to offer any special portion of History, or any special Historical subject, or any subject or period of Literature not included in the list suggested by the Board of Studies, must submit it to the approval of the Board, six months before the Examination.

5. Subject to such regulations as the Board of Studies may make from time to time, select portions of Law, approved by the Board of Legal Studies, may be substituted by Candidates for the special portions of History or special Historical subject required to be offered; provided that no Candidate shall be allowed to offer in the School of Modern History any select portion, whether of Legal or of Historical study, which he has already offered in the School of Jurisprudence.

6. The Examination in the special portion of History or special Historical subject, or in the select portion of Law substituted as above, may be omitted by Candidates who do not aim at a place in the First or Second Class.

7. The Board of Studies may include in the Examination, either as necessary or as optional, other subjects which they may deem suitable to be studied in connection with Modern History, and may prescribe books or portions of books in any language.

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