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(2) They must give in their names to the Regius Professor of Medicine at some time, not less than a fortnight, before the week fixed for the Examination, and must pay a fee of £1.

3. Subjects And Order Of The Examination.—The subjects of the Examination are, (1) Human Anatomy and Physiology, theoretical and practical, (2) the Elements of comparative Anatomy and Physiology, (3) those parts of Physics, Botany, and Chemistry, which subserve Medicine. But those candidates who produce the certificate of special proficiency mentioned above are excused from examination in the subject to which the certificate refers. The Examination usually lasts four days; it is held in the University Museum, and is conducted partly in writing, partly viva voce. Those candidates who satisfy the Examiners receive a certificate to that effect.

2. Second Examination.

1. Time.—This Examination also takes place annually in Michaelmas Term, on a day of which notice is given in the University Gazette.

2. Candidates.—Candidates must have complied with the following conditions:—

(1) They must have completed sixteen Terms since they

passed the Second Public Examination in at least one School, and eight Terms since they passed the First Examination mentioned above.

(2) They must deliver to the Regius Professor of Medicine

a certificate'of having attended some Hospital of good repute, which certificate must be approved by the majority of the Examiners.

(3) They must give in their names to the Regius Professor

at least a fortnight before the week fixed for the Examination, and must pay a fee of £1.

3. Subjects And Order Of The Examination.—The subjects of the Examination are, (1) the Theory and Practice of Medicine, including the diseases of women and children, (2) Materia Medica,

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(3) the Principles of Surgery and Midwifery, (4) Medical Jurisprudence, (5) General Hygiene, (6) Two Medical Authors, either (a) two of the four ancient authors, Hippocrates, Aretaeus, Galen, and Celsus, or (3) one of these and one modern author, approved by the Regius Professor, e.g. Morgagni, Sydenham, or Boerhaave. The Examination is held partly in the University Museum, partly in the Radcliffe Infirmary: it is conducted partly in writing, partly viva voce, and usually lasts four days. Those candidates who satisfy the Examiners receive, on application to the Clerk of the Schools, a certificate to that effect.

Copies of the Examination-papers both of this and of the First Medical Examination may be seen at the Radcliffe Library.

§ 4. Examinations for the Degree of Bachelor of Music.

1. First Examination.

1. Time.—The Examination takes place annually in Michaelmas Term, on a day of which notice is given in the University Gazette.

2. Candidates.—Candidates must have matriculated as members of the University: they must give in their names to the Clerk of the Schools some time before the day of the Examination, and in so doing must pay a fee of £1.

3. Subjects And Order Of The Examination.—The subjects of the Examination are Harmony and easy Counterpoint, in not more than four parts. It is conducted partly viva voce, partly in writing. Those candidates who satisfy the Examiners receive, on application to the Clerk of the Schools, a certificate to that effect.

2. Second Examination.

1. Time.—The Examination takes place annually in Easter or Trinity Term, on a day of which notice is given in the University Gazette.

2. Candidates.—(a) Candidates must have passed the First Examination, and must have composed a piece of Music in fivepart harmony, with an accompaniment for at least five stringed instruments. This piece of music must be forwarded to the Professor of Music at some time before March 1, together with a written assurance that the whole is the candidate's own composition: no candidate can offer himself for the Examination until this composition has been approved by all the Examiners. If approved, it is not to be performed, but a copy of it must be deposited in the Music School.

(|3) They must give in their names to the Clerk of the Schools some time before the day of the Examination, in so doing must pay a fee of £1, and exhibit the certificate of having passed the First Examination.

3. Subjects And Order Of The Examination.—The subjects are, (1) Harmony; (2) Counterpoint, in not more than five parts; (3) Canon, Imitation, &c.; (4) Fugue; (5) Form in Composition; (6) Musical History; (7) A critical knowledge of the full-scores of certain works which are designated from time to time by the Professor of Music, and notified in the University Gazette. The text-books which are recommended for the Examination are Ouseley's Treatises on Harmony and Counterpoint; Berlioz, or Kastner, on Instrumentation; and either Burney's or Hawkins' History of Music. The Examination is conducted partly viva voce, partly in writing. Those candidates who satisfy the Examiners receive, on application to the Clerk of the Schools, a certificate to that effect.

III. EXTRA-ACADEMICAL PRIVILEGES OP STUDENTS AND GRADUATES.

The following are some of the privileges and exemptions of Graduates, and of those who have passed certain of the University Examinations, in regard to admission to the several professions: they are all shared in common with members of other Universities.

1. In Law.

(a) Calls to the Bar. Members of the University who have passed a Public Examination may enter their name at an Inn of Court without passing the preliminary examination: if they have either passed a Public Examination, or have resided two full years at the University, they are, at several Inns, exempted from the payment of the caution-money which is required from other Students: they are allowed to keep their Terms by dining in the Hall of their Inn during three days in each Term: and their three years of studentship may be contemporary with their Oxford course, so that they may qualify themselves for being called to the Bar three years after passing Moderations. (There is an ambiguity in the use of the term 'Public Examination,' but it is usually interpreted to mean Moderations and not Responsions.)

(A) Admission as Attorneys and Solicitors.

1. Any one who has been matriculated at the University, or who has passed the Local Examinations of the University, is exempted from passing the preliminary examination which would otherwise be required before he could be articled.

2. Any member of the University who has passed Moderations can be articled for four years instead of five—and any Bachelor of Arts or of Law for three years instead of five.

2. In Medicine.

(a) Registration. Any Doctor or Bachelor of Medicine is entitled, on payment of a fee of £2 in respect of qualifications obtained before January 1, 1859, and of £5 in respect of qualifications obtained since that date, to be registered as a medical practitioner.

(£) Royal College of Physicians. Any one who has obtained the degree of Doctor or Bachelor of Medicine is exempted from the greater part of the examination for membership of the College.

(c) Royal College 0/Surgeons.

1. Any one who has passed Responsions is exempted from the

preliminary examination for membership of the College.

2. Any one who has taken the Degree of Bachelor or Doctor

of Medicine is exempted from the examination in Medicine for membership of the College.

3. Any one who has taken a degree in Arts, or who has

passed the Examinations which are necessary to qualify him for the status of Student of Medicine, is exempted from the preliminary examination for the Fellowship of the College.

4. Any one who has taken the degree of Bachelor or Doctor

of Medicine is exempted from examination in Medicine for the Fellowship of the College.

(d) Society of Apothecaries.

1. Any one who has passed Responsions is exempted from

the Society's examination in Arts.

2. Any one who has passed the first examination for the degree

of Bachelor of Medicine is admitted to membership of the Society on passing a single examination in Materia Medica, Therapeutics, Medicine, Pathology, Midwifery, and Toxicology.

3. Any one who has taken the degree of Bachelor or Doctor

of Medicine is admitted to membership of the Society on passing a practical examination in Medicine and Midwifery only.

3. In The Army

By the War Office Regulations of April, 1873, a certain number of vacancies for commissions will be allotted in each year to University students. Candidates must either have passed the First Public Examination, in which case their age must be between the limits of seventeen and twenty-one, or have taken a degree in Arts, in which case their age must be between the

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