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respectable person; nor is a licence to reside in lodgings ever refused by the Delegates to a student of good character. A student of mature age can usually obtain permission to reside where he pleases; and a like permission may be granted by the Delegates, under special circumstances, to students who are not of mature age; e.g. they may obtain permission to reside with their parents or their tutor.

A list of licensed lodgings, with the prices of the several sets of rooms annexed, is printed every year, and may be seen at the office of the Delegates of Lodging-houses. The prices vary from 75. to 655. per week. In order, as far as possible, to prevent misunderstanding, a form of agreement between lodging-house keepers and their tenants has been sanctioned by the University, and must be signed by both parties when lodgings are taken.

2. RÉGULATIONS OF COLLEGES AND HALLS.

A student who is unattached to any College or Hall has not to satisfy any other requirements in respect of the place of his residence than those which have been mentioned above; but a member of a College or Hall must also satisfy the requirements of his College or Hall. Most Colleges and Halls prefer that their Undergraduates should complete their necessary residence within the College walls, but some Colleges give an absolute option in the matter, and almost all allow residence outside the College walls under special circumstances. After the completion of twelve, and in some cases of eight, Terms' residence within the College walls, Undergraduates are usually required to remove into lodgings, except in the case of Scholars upon the foundation, who have usually the option of retaining their rooms in College. Those who reside outside the walls of their College or Hall are subject to various rules, of which the most important are subjoined. (The rules in respect to payments and exemptions from payments will be found in Chapter V.)

At University, special permission must be obtained for residence in lodgings before the completion of twelve Terms' residence.

At Balliol, Undergraduates may choose before admission, subject to the necessary limitation of the number of vacant rooms in College, to reside either in College or in lodgings. Those who reside in lodgings may either battel in College, or be wholly independent of the College in respect of their meals. In the latter case they may still, at their option, on giving notice to the manciple, dine in the College hall.

At Merton, Undergraduates are permitted to reside in lodgings during their entire course. They are not obliged to battel in College, but are allowed to do so either partially or entirely.

At Exeter, Undergraduates, at the request of their parents or guardians, are allowed to reside in lodgings during their whole course. As a rule, all Undergraduates are required to go into lodgings after twelve Terms' residence.

At Oriel, Undergraduates, whether Commoners or Scholars, may, with the permission of the College, reside in lodgings during their entire course.

At Queen's, Undergraduates may, with the consent, if they are under age, of their parents or guardians, obtain the leave of the College to reside in lodgings during their whole course. In ordinary cases, however, the College discourages parents and guardians from exposing young men at the outset of their University course to the additional risks involved in residence in lodgings. As a rule, Scholars and Exhibitioners may be required to go out of College after twelve Terms', Commoners after eight Terms', residence. Residents, whether in or out of College, are allowed complete freedom in regulating their own expenses with reference to their meals.

At New College, Commoners, whose parents or guardians desire it, are admitted to reside in lodgings during their whole term of residence. They are under no obligation to battel in College, but will be allowed to do so, either partially or entirely, at the discretion of the College.

At Lincoln, special leave must be obtained for residence in lodgings before the completion of twelve Terms' residence. Those who are allowed to reside in lodgings may further obtain leave either to battel wholly out of College, or to dine only in College, at their option.

At Magdalen, both Commoners and Foundationers can obtain leave to reside in lodgings at any part of their course. Foundationers are usually allowed to occupy rooms in College until they have taken the degree of B.A., or have ceased to be Foundationers. Commoners go out of College after eight Terms' residence.

At Brasenose, Undergraduates of less than twelve Terms' standing may obtain permission to reside in lodgings; but, as a rule, all Undergraduates are required to battel in College.

At Corpus, Commoners may be admitted either (1) to reside in College for a period not exceeding twelve Terms from matriculation; or (2) to reside in lodgings but dine in the College hall and have other meals brought from the College ; or (3) to reside and battel wholly out of College, but attend the College chapel and lectures.

At Christ Church, Undergraduates of less than twelve Terms' standing are allowed to reside out of College only in special cases. All Undergraduates in residence are required to battel in College.

At Trinity, a limited number of Undergraduates are allowed to reside in lodgings until they can be admitted into College.

At St. John's, Undergraduates, whose parents or guardians desire it, are allowed to reside in lodgings during their whole course. All Undergraduates are required to go into lodgings after twelve Terms' residence.

At Wadham, Undergraduates may, under special circumstances, obtain permission to reside in lodgings during their whole course.

At Pembroke, Undergraduates are allowed, under special circumstances, to reside out of College, on condition of their attending the College Lectures, and, unless specially exempted, of their batteling in College and attending the College Chapel.

At Worcester, Undergraduates, under special circumstances, are allowed to reside in lodgings during their whole course. All Commoners, but not Scholars, go out of College, unless they obtain special permission to remain in, after twelve Terms' residence.

At St. Mary Hall, Undergraduates may reside either in Hall or in lodgings, and may battel either wholly or partially in Hall. All Undergraduates, as a rule, except the Dyke Scholars, go into lodgings after eight Terms' residence in Hall.

At St. Edmund Hall, Undergraduates may, subject to the consent of their parents, reside in lodgings during their whole course. Those who do so are not required to battel in Hall, but may do so to whatever extent they think proper.

At St. Alban Hall, Undergraduates may obtain leave from the Principal to reside in lodgings during their whole course. They are not required to battel in Hall.

At Keble, no Undergraduates reside in lodgings.

At Charsley's Hall, Undergraduates may reside in the Hall or not, at their option.

III. OF DISCIPLINE.

§ 1. University Discipline.

The nature of the discipline which is exercised by the University over its junior members has varied both with the increase in the average age of graduation and with the variations in the general habits of society. When the University took the place which is filled at present by the Public Schools, the Statute-book contained an elaborate series of minute prohibitory enactments, which had become practically obsolete long before they were formally repealed, and of which but few traces now remain. At present the discipline, if not more lax, is at least compatible with a greater degree of freedom on the part of a student. The rules which are in force are neither numerous nor irksome. They concern chiefly (1) the wearing of the prescribed academical dress, (2) the non-frequenting of certain places, (3) the abstinence from certain practices, which are regarded as incompatible with the habits of a student.

1. Junior members of the University are required by the Statutes to wear a prescribed academical dress 'quoties in publicum prodeunt. This regulation has gradually been narrowed in practice, but the cap and gown are still required to be worn (1) always before I P.M., and after sunset; (2) always within the precincts of the Schools, whether a student is or is not under examination; (3) at University Sermons; (4) in calling officially upon any officer of the University.

2. They are required to abstain from frequenting hotels or taverns, except for reasons to be approved by the Vice-Chancellor or Proctors.

3. They are not allowed to keep a horse or to drive a vehicle of any kind except with the consent both of their College or Hall, and of the Proctors; nor to smoke in the streets; nor to engage in any games of chance; nor to take part in, or subscribe money for, horse-races or shooting-matches.

The punishments which are inflicted for a breach of any of these rules consist of (1) pecuniary fines, the amount of which is in some cases specified in the Statutes, but is more usually left to the discretion of the Vice-Chancellor or the Proctors; (2) rustication, i.e. banishment from the University for a definite period; (3) expulsion from the University.

§ 2. The Chancellor's Court.

By virtue of an ancient privilege, the existence of which has been repeatedly acknowledged by the highest Courts of Law, the University can claim exclusive jurisdiction in all matters, whether civil or criminal, to which its resident members are parties.

Offences of the gravest class fall under the cognizance of the High Steward or his deputy, but in practice the privilege of the High Steward has been seldom claimed, and all criminal charges, in which a resident member of the University is concerned, are in the first instance brought before the Vice-Chancellor, who is by Royal Charter a Justice of the Peace for the counties of Oxford and Berks, and are either dealt with summarily or remitted by him to the ordinary Courts of Law for trial, as circumstances may require. All cases of debt and other civil actions fall under the cognizance of the Chancellor's Court, which is held in the Apodyterium of the Convocation House every Friday during Term, and in which, for the better administration of justice, the Chancellor, or Vice-Chancellor, is usually represented by a legal assessor, who must be a Bachelor or Doctor of Civil Law. The procedure of this Court is assimilated to that of the County Courts, and the parties to a suit are usually represented by their 'Proctors,' that is, by certain Masters of Arts or Bachelors of Civil Law or Attorneys or Barristers-at-law, who have been admitted to practise in the Court. The Court has the power not only of imposing Academical penalties, such as rustication and expulsion, but also of distraint and imprisonment.

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