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The subjects are as follows:—(1) Two Greek plays; or One Greek play, and an equivalent amount of Homer, Thucydides, or Demosthenes. (2) The Georgics of Virgil, or any four books of the iEneid, or an equivalent amount from Horace, Livy, Cicero, or Tacitus. (3) Translation from English into Latin Prose. (4) Grammar and Parsing. (5) The Gospels and Old Testament History. (6) Unseen passages from the Greek and Latin Authors usually read in the highest Forms of Schools. (7) Euclid Books I and II, and Algebra as far as simple Equations inclusive. (8) The whole of Arithmetic, as given in the school text-books of Colenso, Barnard Smith, or Todhunter.

Candidates are invited to name any other subject to which they may have given special attention, such as the higher Mathematics, History, Physical Science, or Modern Languages.

At Balliol the Examination is usually held in each Term on the Friday or Saturday of the week in which the College meets in Lent Term and Easter Term; and on the first Saturday in Michaelmas Term. Candidates are expected to be present at Nine o'clock A.m.

The subjects are as follows :—(1) Divinity, including the Gospels in Greek. (2) In Greek, Homer and some Attic author; in Latin, Virgil, Cicero, or Livy;—at the discretion of the Examiners. (3) Translation from English into Latin Prose. (4) Questions in Greek and Latin Grammar. (5) English Composition. (6) Euclid, Books I and II; or the first part of Algebra. (7) Arithmetic, as far as Decimals, inclusive.

Candidates may also be examined, if they please, in other subjects, such as History, Composition in Modern Languages, and the more advanced parts of Mathematics. Proficiency in these will be accepted as compensation for some degree of failure in classical attainments, provided there be reason to suppose that the Candidate will be able to pass the University Examinations.

At Merton the Examination is held three times in the year, viz. on the last Wednesday in November, February, and May, at Ten o'clock A.m.

The subjects are as follows:—(1) Latin Prose Composition. (2) Translation from Latin. (3) Arithmetic. (4) Euclid, Books I and II; or Elementary Algebra. (5) Viva voce examination in portions of one Greek and one Latin author: the following are recommended— Euripides, Hecuba and Alcestis. Virgil, jfEneid I—V.

The candidate may also offer for special examination any portion of any of the subjects recognized by the University Examinations.

At Exeter the Examination is held at least once in each Term.

The subjects are as follows:—(1) Two Greek Plays by the same author: the Medea and Hecuba of Euripides, or the CEdipus Rex and Antigone of Sophocles, preferred. (2) Horace, three books of the Odes, and the Ars Poetica.—Special leave must be obtained, if the candidates wish to substitute any other books. (3) Arithmetic. (4) Euclid, Books I and II; or Algebra, to simple equations inclusive. (5) Latin Prose Composition. (6) The Outline of Scripture History.

Weight will be given to any additional books or special subjects in which Candidates may desire to be examined. The Examination is not competitive, but candidates are not allowed to matriculate who do not satisfy the Examiners that, with due diligence, they will be able to pass the University Examinations.

At Oriel the Examination is usually held at the beginning of each Term. The subjects are the same as those which are required by the University at Responsions. with the addition of easy translation papers from Greek and Latin Authors which have not been specially prepared.

At Queen's the Examination (for residence in the following Term) is ordinarily held (1) on the day after Ash-Wednesday, (2) on the Thursday after Ascension Day, (3) on the second Thursday in November. Supplementary Examinations are held, when required, on the Thursday before the beginning of each Term.

The subjects are as follows:—(1) Greek and Latin Grammar. (2) Translations from English into Latin Prose. (3) Greek Books:—The Hecuba and Alcestis of Euripides. Latin Books:—Virgil's .fEneid I—V. Or some equivalent Latin and Greek Books. The easiest to offer are four books of Caesar and four books of Xenophon. Candidates are recommended not to offer Cicero or Homer. (4) Arithmetic; and Euclid, Books I and II; or Algebra, as far as Simple Equations inclusive.

At New College the Examination is ordinarily held only once a year, about Easter: residence usually commences in the following October, but those who wish to offer themselves for Responsions in Act Term may do so. The Examination is directed to ascertain that Candidates for admission have a reasonable prospect (1) of passing all the necessary Examinations of the University; (2) of reading with profit to themselves for Honours in some one school.

The Examination consists partly of necessary, partly of optional subjects.

The necessary subjects are :—(1) Divinity, including the Gospels in Greek (except for those who can claim exemption, according to the Statutes of the University, from Divinity Examinations: see below, pp. 114, 127). (2) Easy Passages for translation from the Classical Authors usually read in schools: at the discretion of the Examiners. (3) Translation from English into Latin Prose. (4) Greek and Latin Grammar. (5) Euclid, Books I and II; or, for those who prefer it, Algebra as far as Simple Equations inclusive. (6) Arithmetic. (7) English Composition.

The optional subjects are:-—(1) Greek and Latin Languages. (2) History. (3) Mathematics. (4) Natural Science.

Candidates who offer History are requested to select one or more periods of Ancient or Modern History, such, for instance, as the following:—Greek History: During the fifth century B.C. From 432 B.C. to the death of Philip of Macedon. Roman History: To the end of the Samnite Wars. From 280 B.C. to the fall of C. Gracchus. During the first century B.C. English History: Down to Magna Charta. Under the Plantagenets. Under the Stuarts. French History: From Charlemagne to the Accession of Louis XI. Under the house of Valois. Italian History: During the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries.

A general History Paper will also be set at the discretion of the Examiners.

Candidates offering Mathematics are requested to state how much they have read in that subject.

Candidates offering Natural Science are requested to select one or more of the following subjects: Physics, Chemistry, Physiology.

Proficiency in any one of the optional subjects will be accepted as compensation for defective knowledge of the necessary subjects, pro- j vided there be reason to believe that the candidate will be able to pass Responsions within the first two Terms of his residence.

At Lincoln the Examination is held three times a year, on the first Saturday in each Term. The subjects are the same as are required at Responsions.

At Magdalen the Examination is usually held at the end of each Term and also at the beginning of Michaelmas Term. The subjects are the same as are required at Responsions.

At Brasenose the Examination is held at the end of Michaelmas and Hilary Terms, and in Whitsun week. The subjects are the same in kind as are required at Responsions, with the addition of the Rudiments of Religious Knowledge.

At Corpus the subjects of the ordinary Matriculation Examination are as follows: — (1) Translation from English into Latin Prose.

(2) Translation into English of an unprepared passage of Attic Greek.

(3) Some portion of a Greek and of a Latin Book (selected by the candidate), with Parsing and General Questions on Greek and Latin Grammar. (4) Arithmetic, including Vulgar and Decimal Fractions, and Interest. (5) Euclid, Books I and II; or Algebra to Simple Equations. Candidates may also be examined, if they desire it (notice being given to the President not less than fourteen days before the day of Examination), in other subjects, such as History, English Composition, Natural Science, and Higher Mathematics: and proficiency in such subjects will be accepted as compensation for some inferiority in Classics, provided there be reason to suppose that the candidate will be able to pass the necessary University Examinations.

At Christ Church the Examination is held twice in the year:—(1) On the Thursday and Friday after the 10th of October, with a view to residence in the January following. [If the 10th of October be Thursday, the Examination will begin on that day; but if the loth of October be Friday, the Examination will begin on the 16th of October.] (2) On the Wednesday and Thursday in the third week before the Commemoration, with a view to residence in the October following. Candidates must call on the Dean at 130. P.m. on the first of the two days.

The subjects of Examination are the same as are required for Responsions, viz.:—(1) Euripides, Alcestis and Hecuba, or Homer, Iliad I—V, or an equivalent quantity from some other Greek Author. (2) Virgil, iEneid, I—V, or Horace, Odes I—III and Ars Poetica, or an equivalent quantity from some other Latin Author. (3) Latin Prose Composition. (4) Latin and Greek Grammar. (5) Arithmetic. (6) The first two books of Euclid, or Algebra to Simple Equations inclusively.

At Trinity, candidates for residence in October are usually examined in the May preceding, and candidates for residence in January in the November preceding. The subjects are:—(1) Translation from English into Latin prose. (2) Translation of a passage of unprepared Greek into English. (3) Two plays of Sophocles, prepared. (4) Five books of the Mneid, prepared. (5) Arithmetic. (6) Euclid I, II, or the first part of Algebra. For (3) and (4) equivalents may, by permission, be offered.

At St. John's the Examination is held at the beginning of every Term, and before the Long Vacation. The subjects are:—^1) Latin Prose composition. (2) Greek and Latin Grammar. (3) Arithmetic.

(4) Euclid, I, II. (5) Euripides, Hecuba and Alcestis. (6) Virgil, jEneid, I to V, or equivalents.

At Jesus the Examination includes the Writing of Latin Prose, Questions in Greek and Latin Grammar, Arithmetic, Elementary Algebra, or two books of Euclid. Candidates are also usually examined in the Hecuba and Medea of Euripides, and in three books of the Odes of Horace.

At Wadham the Examination is held in the latter part of each Term, and also at the beginning of Michaelmas Term.

The subjects are :—(1) One Greek and one Latin Author, chosen by the Candidate, such as—Two plays of Sophocles or Euripides, or Five Books of Homer. The Georgics of Virgil, or Five Books of the vEneid, or Horace, Odes, Books I-III, with the Ars Poetica or portions of other Classical Authors of like quantity. (2) Latin Prose Composition, (3) Greek and Latin Grammar. (4) Arithmetic. (5) Euclid, Books I-II, or Algebra as far as Simple Equations. (6) The matter of the Gospels.

At Pembroke, the Examination is usually held on the day before the commencement of the Term in which the candidate proposes to reside. The subjects are the same as are required at Responsions.

At Worcester the Examination is held at the beginning and end of every Term. The subjects are:—(1) The Hecuba and Alcestis of Euripides, with especial reference to the Parsing and Grammar generally. (2) Cicero, de Amicitia and de Senectute. (3) Translation from English into Latin Prose. (4) Colenso's Arithmetic to the end of Square Root.

(5) Euclid, Books I, II, or Colenso's Algebra to the end of Simple Equations.

A further examination in English, French, or German is optional.

At the Halls candidates are usually required to satisfy the Principal that they are likely to pass their University Examinations within a reasonable period of time, but there are no fixed subjects of examination.

At Keble the Examination is usually held in October. The subjects are: — (i) Euripides, Hecuba and Medea, or Sophocles, Ajax and Electra. (2) Virgil, the Georgics, or Horace, Odes I-III, with the Ars Poetica. (3) Euclid, or Algebra. (4) Arithmetic. (5) Greek and Latin Grammar.

Candidates to whom rooms have been promised receive them upon condition of coming up to the College standard in the Matriculation Examination; but, in exceptional cases, persons who have applied too late to receive a promise of rooms are allowed to offer themselves on the chance of being selected by the Warden to fill such extra vacancies as may fall in.

3. Fees. The sums payable to a College or Hall on admission usually consist of (1) an admission-fee, (2) caution-money. Both these sums vary in amount at different Colleges; the latter is a deposif which is held by the College or Hall as a guarantee against possible loss, and is not required when, as at New College, St. Mary Hall, St. Edmund Hall, and Keble College, the battels are, or may be, paid either weekly, or terminally in advance: it is always returned when the name is removed from the College books, and sometimes at an earlier period. The sums payable under both the above-mentioned heads, and also the regulations as to the return of the caution-money, are specified on p. 174.

§ 2. Requirements of the Delegates of Unattached Students.

Persons who desire to be admitted to the University without becoming members of a College or Hall must apply to the Delegates of Unattached Students, who are bound to' satisfy themselves that the candidates are of good character, that (unless they are of mature age) they have the consent of their parents or guardians to their living in lodgings, and that they are likely to derive educational advantage from becoming matriculated members of the University.

The Censors hold an examination of such candidates at the beginning of every Term.

The subjects of the ordinary examination are:— (1) Three Books of Homer, or One Greek Play. (Candidates are advised to offer either the Hecuba or the

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