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Hyatt, Packard, and Henslow. The arguments against organic evolution in general may be found in Agassiz's Essay on Classification, in Dawson's History of Fossil Plants, in Barrande's Cephalopodes, and (in more popular form) in the Duke of Argyll’s Reign of Law.

To avoid what might have sounded like the editorial we, the authors, when speaking in the first person, have throughout used the singular number of the pronoun.

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THE DEVELOPMENT THEORY.

CHAPTER I.

THE QUESTION STATED.

In the world

of living things, there is hardly

of kinds, both of animals and of plants. It is this idea of variety, more than any other thought, that impresses one after an hour or a day spent in a museum of natural history; and the impression grows deeper as the student of zoology or botany becomes more and more familiar with the extent of the work that lies before him. With this appreciation of the great diversity of the forms of life, there comes, too, another thought.

If there are, of flowering plants alone, probably more than a hundred thousand kinds, and of the flowerless sorts no one can tell how many ; if there are, of but one class of animals (the in

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