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Jonson, Ben.

MULMAN, HENRY HART.
The Good Life, Long Life, 13 The Burial Anthem,

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Hymn to God the Father, 13

Character of True Valour, 212 MILNES, RICHARD MONCKTON.
Advice to a Reckless Youth, 213 The Charities of the Poor,
The Bower,
371 The Worth of Hours, .

2
KEATE, WILLIAM.

Milton, John.

Westminster Abbey,

Hymn to the Creator,

Worship of the Angels,

KEBLE, John.

Morning Hymn,

Morning Hymn,

143

On his own Blindness,

Evening Hymn,

145

Eve's Lament on her Expul-

Reflections on Flowers,

sion from Paradise,

Glory,

23
KEN, THOMAS.

The Garden of Eden,

Evening Hymn,

42

Evening Repose,

37

The Genius of the Wood 37
KING, HENRY,
The Life of Man,

20

:
The Dirge,

MITFORD, MARY RUSSEL,

20

The Voice of Praise,

281

KNOWLES, HERBERT.
The Three Tabernacles, 134

Moir, D. M.
Moralizing,

300

Knox, WILLIAM.

The Atheist,

. 154 MONTGOMERY, JAMES.

The Visible Creation,

106

KRUMMACHER.

What is Prayer ?

108

The Days of Creation, 176 The Field of the World, 266

Instruction,

• 267
LAMB, CHARLES.

The Pelican Island,

396
Tne Sabbath Bells,
274 A Sweet Landscape,

397

• 37

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• 291

• 292

118

• 278
402

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• 183

.

Humble and Unnoticed Virtue, 251

Mason, WILLIAM.

Immortality,

78 NEELE, HENRY,

Hymns for Children, 136

MASSINGER, PHILIP.

The Condition of Kings Hu- NICOLL, ROBERT.

man,

215 Death,

158

MERRICK, JAMES.

NORTON, CAROLINÉ.

The Providence of God, 71 An Emblem of Life,

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. 326

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OGILVIE, JOHN.

ROGERS, SAMUEL.

All Creatures called on to Human Life,

258

praise God,

87 Age,

259

Recollections of Youth,

ORNE, CAROLINE F.

Labour,

312

Highlands of Scotland,

405

PARNELL, THOMAS.

SANDYS, GEORGE.

A Hymn to Contentment, 52

The Works of God,

14

PARTRIDGE, SAMUEL W.

The Little Teacher,

314 SAVAGE, RICHARD.

Advantages of Adversity,

PATTERSON, ROBERT.

The Gap of Dunloe, Killarney, 414

SCHMOLEK.

PEABODY, WILLIAM 0.

Heavenward,

178

Hymn of Nature,

185

Burial Hymn,

The

Autumn Evening,

SCOTT, SIR WALTER.

PENNY MAGAZINE.

Hymn of the Hebrew Maid, . 105

The Alpine Horn,

Time,

268

Fancied Happiness, : 269

PERCIVAL, JAMES Gates.

Loch Katrine,

Consolations of Religion to Mountain Scenery,

the Poor,

189 Theron, or the Praise of Rural

Life,

439

POPE, ALEXANDER.

Restoration of Jerusalem, 58

A Lesson of Thankfulness,

SHAKSPEARE,

WILLIAM.

58

Universal Beneficence of Pro.

Death,

vidence,

Fallen Greatness,

204

60

The Dying Christian to his

Sleep,

205

Soul,

61

The Power of Music,

206

Greatness,

The Favour of Princes, 207

Universal Order,

The Seven Ages of Man,

Self-Knowledge,

Female Friendship,

233

Knowledge Progressive,

Flattery and Friendship,

234

Contentment,

Life,

355

Usefulness,

210

Country Sports,

381

Windsor Forest,

Neglected Opportunity, 210

Description of Cleopatra sail-

370

PORTEUS, BEILBY.

ing down the Cydnus,

Death,

86 Happiness of a Shepherd's

Ambition,

Life,

429

PRINGLE, THOMAS.

SHENSTONE, WILLIAM.

The Scotch Emigrant's Noon- The Shepherd's Home,

day Dream in Africa, 417

PRIOR, MATTHEW.

SHERBURNE, SIR EDWARD.

Charity,

43

To the Eternal Wisdom, 36

Reflections on Human Life, 226

SHIRLEY, JAMES.

QUARLES, FRANCIS.

Death's Final Conquest, 26

Delight in God only,

21

Soliloquy on Death,

27

The Shortness of Life,

23

On Time,

23

Man,

220

SMART, CHRISTOPHER.

On Recovering from a Dan-

RAFFLES, THOMAS.

gerous Illness,

77

The Hour of Prayer,

The Final Judgment,

:

163

77

RALEIGH, SIR WALTER.

· 247

• 437

SOUTHEY, CAROLINE.

Lines composed the night be- I weep, but not Rebellious

fore his execution,

4 Tears,

160

The Pilgrimage,

4 The Mariner's Hymn, 161

I

Pas

. 272

273
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SOUTHEY, ROBERT.

WATTS; ISAAC.

The Dead Friend,

114 The Creation,

Education,

Song to Creative Wisdom,

Industry,

Earth and Heaven,

22

Benefits of Affliction,

A Mountain Landscape, . 401 WHITE, HENRY KIRKE.

A Hymn for Family Worship, 124

The Christian's Progress, 125

SOUTHWELL, ROBERT.

Lowliness of Mind,

281

Conscience,

7

On Time,

282

Instability of Human Glory,' 282

SPENSER, EDMUND.

From the Hymn of Heavenly

WIFFEN, JEREMIAH HOLME.

Beauty,

4

War,

294

Wisdom, true riches,

A Landscape,

. 369

Wilcox, CARLOS.

Active Christian Benevolence

STOLBERG, CHRISTIAN AND FRED.

the Source of Sublime and

Thanksgiving Song,

173

Lasting Happiness,

289

SYLVESTER, Joshua.

A Contented Mind,

WILLIS, NATHANIEL P.

8

A Child's First Impression of

& Star,

327

TAYLOR, EMILY.

Human Life,

306

WILSON, JOHN.

Magdalene's Hymn,

151

TAYLOR, JANE.

A Churchyard Scene,

410

Teaching from the Stars, ,

Soliloquy.

305

The Children's Dance, 412

Breaking up of the Children's

THEOCRITUS.

Dance,

413

Summer Woodlands,

424

WITHER, GEORGE.

Psalm cxlviii.

16

THOMSON, JAMES.

The Marigold,

218

A Hymn on the Seasons, 65

The Virtuous Man,

219

Dependence on Providence, 68

Peace,

The study and Beauties of

WORDSWORTH,

WILLIAM

the Works of Nature, 341

The Labourers's Noonday

Hymn,

104

Happiness of a Couptry Life, 356

Jehovah'the Provider,"

105

Scene between May and June, 386

The Yew-tree Seat,

Sheep-shearing,

264

436

Education of the Poor, the

265

Duty of the State,

TUPPER, MARTIN F.

The Siudy of Nature,

353

The Study of Nature

Influence of Natural Objects, 349

VAUGHAN, HENRY.

Nutting,

The Idle Shepherd Boys,

Early Rising and Prayer, 37

VIRGIL.

WOTTON, SIR HENRY.

The Charms of a Country Life, 423

The Happy Life,

10

Farewell to the Vanities of

210

WALLER, EDMUND.

the World,

Love of God to Man,

29

Praise of a country Life,

Warton, THOMAS.

YOUNG, EDWARD.

The Hamlet,

379 The Man whose Thoughts are

not of this World,

54

WASTELL, SIMON.

An Address to the Deity,

56

Man's Mortality,

9 The Death of a Good Man an

incentive to Virtue,

57

Watts, ALARIC A.

The Emptiness of Riches, 230

A Remonstrance,

292 Retirement of Country Life, 201

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SELECTIONS FROM THE BRITISH POETS.

VOLUME I.

SACRED.

EARLIER POETS, FROM CHAUCER TO COWPER.

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS.

Pity religion has so seldom found,
A skilful guide into poetic ground,
The flowers would spring where'er she deigned to stray,
And every muse attend her on her way.-COWPER.

It has been deemed proper to assign the first division in the plan of this work to Sacred Poetry, Many arguments might be adduced, and supported by the highest authorities, to prove that poetry is never more nobly employed than when it infuses into the mind a spirit of piety, and elevates the thoughts of man to his Maker. It is not intended, however,

in these preliminary observations, to enter upon a defence of Sacred Poetry, or to describe the important benefits which have been conferred on the cause of religion and morality by the most eminent contributors to this department of our literature. A few remarks may, nevertheless, be necessary to explain the principal objects which have been kept in view in making the selections for this part of the present volume. It will be observed, that many of them have been taken from the early poets commencing with CHAUCER, and that some of the most brilliant extract 3 are the productions of writers who flourished during the age of Queen Elizabeth—“ an age," as the eloquent Hazlitt observes,“ distinguished beyond, perhaps, any other in our history by a number of great men, famous in different ways, and whose names have come down to us wit 2 unblemished honors,"*

In all ages of onr literary history it has been remarked, that almost every author of distinction among the British Poets, has devoted his talents, on particular occasions, to render poetry the handmaid of religion. Hence it is, that there are few of our great writers who have not, at some period during their lives, composed verses of a devotional character,

* Hazlitt's “Lectures on the Li:erature of the Age of Elizabeth." VOL. I.

although their works may not generally be remarkable for their religion tendency, nor specially designed to promote pious objects. This observ tion applies with equal force to the greater number of our modern poet from whose writings we have taken some of the best specimens of serioz poetry. Many of these effusions, though not strictly entitled to the appe lation of Sacred, combine genuine poetic taste with the purest religiou sentiment, and are eminently fitted to inspire devotional feelings. Ou old English literature is peculiarly rich in poetry of this description; an it was for these reasons considered advisable to insert a numerous clas of extracts which are decidedly religious in their tendency.

It is many years ago since WARTON, TYRWHITT, Ritson, Bishop Percy ELLIS, HEADLEY, and other men of learning, had the merit of calling pub lic attention to the treasures of our ancient English poetry. At a period still more recent, the exquisite taste of CAMPBELL, the critical knowledge of Souther, the research of HALLAM, and of other modern authors, have rescued from oblivion some of the most valuable contributions to our old poetical literature. These eminent critics have not, however, attempted to give anything like a complete history of English Sacred Poetry, or a biographical account of the many pious and distinguished men who have excelled in its cultivation. This important department of literature is now no longer neglected. It has been recently investigated by scholars possessing the requisite erudition, industry, and taste. Of these the first in rank and merit is Mr. Robert Aris WILLMOTT, of Trinity College, Cambridge, who published, in 1839, the “Lives of the English Sacred Poets,” with specimens of their writings. Many of the most beautiful pieces inserted in this work are taken from that valuable collection, and quotations are given from Mr. WILLMOTT's criticisms, distinguished for their elegance of style, judgment, and impartiality. This gentleman was preceded in his labours by the Rev. R. CATTERMOLE, who published, in 1836, two volumes, entitled “ Specimens of Sacred Poetry of the Seventeenth Century," with an introductory essay and critical remarks. This interesting work contains some of the richest and most varied productions of the Sacred muse. A still more modern collection of pieces, in this department of literature, has been brought out in two volumes, by J. W. PARKER, the well-known publisher in London, under the name of Gems of Sacred Poetry”—

"-an appellation which they justly merit. It may, perhaps, be urged as one ground of objection to the following pieces, that they are generally, especially those extracted from the old writers, of too difficult a character, and suited only to the instruction of those readers whose poetical tastes are in some degree cultivated. The Collection of Sacred Poetry already published by the Commissioners of National Education, is designed for children of tender years. In the present compilation, therefore, is embodied poetry of a higher order, and adapted generally to a more advanced class of pupils. No piece has been introduced that is not imbued with a religious spirit, untinctured by sectarian peculiarities, and calculated by its pure and elevating tendency to make a lasting impression upon the mind and heart. The main object of this collection, and especially of that important portion of it appropriated to poetry of a devotional character, will be fully attained, if it

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