Memoir of the Life of Richard Henry Lee, and His Correspondence with the Most Distinguished Men in America and Europe: Illustrative of Their Characters, and of the Events of the American Revolution, Volume 1

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H.C. Carey and I. Lea, 1825 - United States
 

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Page 278 - And that this assemblage of horrors might want no fact of distinguished die, he is now exciting those very people to rise in arms among us. and to purchase that liberty of which he has deprived them, by murdering the people on whom he also obtruded them : thus paying off' former crimes committed against the LIBERTIES of one people with crimes which he urges them to commit against the LIVES of another...
Page 278 - Determined to keep open a market where MEN should be bought and sold, he has prostituted his negative for suppressing every legislative attempt to prohibit or to restrain this execrable commerce.
Page 277 - He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative Powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within.
Page 277 - For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies...
Page 280 - Britain; and finally we do assert and declare these colonies to be free and independent states,] and that as free and independent states, they have full power to levy war, conclude peace, contract alliances, establish commerce, and to do all other acts and things which independent states may of right do. And for the support of this declaration, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.
Page 277 - He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitutions, and unacknowledged by our laws ; giving his assent to their acts of pretended legislation : For quartering large bodies of armed troops among us . For protecting them, by a mock trial, from punishment for any murders which they should commit on the inhabitants of these states ; For cutting off our trade with all parts of the world...
Page 171 - DO, in the name and by the authority of the good people of these colonies, solemnly publish and declare, that these united colonies, are, and of right ought to be, free and independent states ; that they are absolved from all allegiance to the British crown, and that all political connexion between them and the state of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved...
Page 240 - An Ordinance for the government of the territory of the United States North west of the river Ohio.
Page 2 - Co. of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit : " Tadeuskund, the Last King of the Lenape. An Historical Tale." In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States...
Page 279 - We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend [a] jurisdiction over [these our States], We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here, [no one of which could warrant so strange a pretension: that these were effected at the expense of our own blood and treasure, unassisted by the wealth or the strength of Great Britain...

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