The British Essayists;: Spectator

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J. Johnson, J. Nichols and son, R. Baldwin, F. and C. Rivington, W. Otridge and son, W.J. and J. Richardson, A. Strahan, R. Faulder, ... [and 40 others], 1808 - English essays
 

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Page 236 - OF man's first disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heavenly Muse...
Page 242 - Anon, out of the earth a fabric huge Rose like an exhalation, with the sound Of dulcet symphonies and voices sweet, Built like a temple...
Page 238 - Hail horrors, hail Infernal world, and thou profoundest Hell Receive thy new possessor; one who brings A mind not to be changed by place or time.
Page 242 - A shout, that tore Hell's concave, and beyond Frighted the reign of Chaos and old Night.
Page 276 - Rocks, caves, lakes, fens, bogs, dens, and shades of death, A universe of death, which God by curse Created evil, for evil only good, Where all life dies, death lives, and nature breeds, Perverse, all monstrous, all prodigious things, Abominable, inutterable, and worse Than fables yet have feigned, or fear conceived, Gorgons and hydras, and chimeras dire.
Page 179 - Errors, like straws, upon the surface flow; He who would search for pearls, must dive below.
Page 184 - So spake the cherub; and his grave rebuke, Severe in youthful beauty, added grace Invincible: abash'd the devil stood, And felt how awful goodness is, and saw Virtue in her shape how lovely; saw, and pined His loss: but chiefly to find here observed His lustre visibly impair'd; yet seem'd Undaunted. If I must contend...
Page 242 - Had to impose : he through the armed files Darts his experienced eye, and soon traverse The whole battalion views, their order due, Their visages and stature as of gods ; Their number last he sums. And now his heart Distends with pride, and, hardening in his strength, Glories...
Page 240 - ... rises. Something like this we saw actually come to pass; for the water was stained to a surprising redness; and as we observed in travelling, had discoloured the sea a great way into a reddish hue; occasioned doubtless by a sort of minium, or red earth, washed into the river by the violence of the rain, and not by any stain from Adonis's blood.
Page 238 - Abject and lost lay these, covering the flood Under amazement of their hideous change. He call'd so loud that all the hollow deep Of Hell resounded.

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