The Psychological Review, Volume 3

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Page 259 - Against foul fiends to aid us militant ! They for us fight ; they watch and duly ward, And their bright squadrons round about us plant ; And all for love and nothing for reward : Oh why should heavenly God to men have such regard) THE SEASONS.
Page 202 - Do unto others as ye would that they should do unto you " ? This was the doctrine of Lao-tsze.
Page 156 - After that thou shalt come to the hill of God, where is the garrison of the Philistines: and it shall come to pass, when thou art come thither to the city, that thou shalt meet a company of prophets com'ing down from the high place with a psaltery, and a tabret, and a pipe, and a harp, before them; and they shall prophesy: and the Spirit of the LORD will come upon thee, and thou shalt prophesy with them, and shalt be turned into another man.
Page 156 - And when they came thither to the hill, behold, a company of prophets met him ; and the Spirit of God came upon him, and he prophesied among them. 11 And it came to pass, when all that knew him beforetime saw that, behold, he prophesied among the prophets, then the people said one to another, What is this that is come unto the son of Kish ? Is Saul also among the prophets...
Page 74 - Because every thought of man upon being evolved passes into the inner world, and becomes an active entity by associating itself, coalescing we might term it, with an elemental — that is to say, with one of the semi-intelligent forces of the kingdoms. It survives as an active intelligence — a creature of the mind's begetting — for a longer or shorter period proportionate with the original intensity of the cerebral action which generated it.
Page 258 - They that love beyond the world cannot be separated by it. Death cannot kill what never dies. " Nor can spirits ever be divided that love and live in the same divine principle, the root and record of their friendship.
Page 240 - Her majesty," says Lady Southwell, " being in very good health one day, Sir John Stanhope, vice-chamberlain, and Sir Robert Cecil's dependent and familiar; came and presented her majesty with a piece of gold, of the bigness of an angel, full of characters, which he said an old woman in Wales had bequeathed to her (the queen) on her deathbed, and thereupon he discoursed how the said testatrix, by virtue of the piece of gold, lived to the age of...
Page 137 - And what confirms him in the belief of this, is, that the great man told him, that he must come down to earth, be born of such a woman, meet with such and such things, and in particular, that he should once in his life be guilty of murder. At this he was displeased, a.nd told the great man, he would never murder. But the great man replied, " I have said it, and it shall be so.
Page 257 - I think a person who is thus terrified with the imagination of ghosts and spectres much more reasonable, than one who, contrary to the reports of all historians, sacred and profane, ancient and modern, and to the traditions of all nations, thinks the appearance of spirits fabulous and groundless.
Page 128 - Which I wish to remark, And my language is plain, That for ways that are dark And for tricks that are vain, The heathen Chinee is peculiar, Which the same I would rise to explain.

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