Handbook for Visitors to Stratford-upon-Avon

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E. Adams, 1860 - 48 pages

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Page 19 - And though this, probably the first essay of his poetry, be lost, yet it is said to have been so very bitter, that it redoubled the prosecution against him to that degree, that he was obliged to leave his business and family in Warwickshire, for some time, and shelter himself in London.
Page 7 - Be not too tame, neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor; suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first and now, was and is to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure.
Page 18 - Upon his leaving school, he seems to have given intirely into that way of living which his father propos'd to him ; and in order to settle in the world after a family manner, he thought fit to marry while he was yet very young. His wife was the daughter of one Hathaway, said to have been a substantial yeoman in the neighbourhood of Stratford.
Page 7 - ... t were, the mirror up to Nature ; to show virtue her own feature ; scorn, her own image ; and the very age and body of the time, his form and pressure. Now, this overdone, or come tardy off, though it make the unskilful laugh, cannot but make the judicious grieve ; the censure of which one must, in your allowance, o'erweigh a whole theatre of others.
Page 18 - He had, by a misfortune common enough to young fellows, fallen into ill company ; and amongst them, some that made a frequent practice of deer-stealing, engaged him more than once in robbing a park that belonged to Sir Thomas Lucy, of Charlecote, near Stratford. For this he was prosecuted by that gentleman, as he thought, somewhat too severely ; and in order to revenge that ill usage, he made a ballad upon him.
Page 18 - For this he was prosecuted by that gentleman, as he thought, somewhat too severely ; and in order to revenge that ill-usage he made a ballad upon him. And though this, probably the first essay of his poetry, be lost, yet it is said to have been so very bitter, that it redoubled...
Page 18 - In this kind of settlement he continued for some time, till an extravagance that he was guilty of, forced him both out of his country, and that way of living which he had taken up ; and though it seemed at first to be a blemish upon his good manners, and a misfortune...
Page 7 - The celebrated mulberry-tree, planted by Shakspeare's hand, became first an object of his dislike, because it subjected him to answer the frequent importunities of travellers, whose zeal might prompt them to visit it. In an evil hour the sacrilegious priest ordered the tree, then remarkably large and at its full growth, to be cut down ; which was no sooner done, than it was cleft to pieces for fire-wood...
Page 7 - About five feet from the floor, on the north wall, is a monument, raised by the grateful tenderness of those who did not venture to apprehend that the works of such a man must embalm his memory through every succeeding age. Inarched between two Corinthian columns of black marble, with gilded bases and capitals, is here placed the half-length effigies of Shakspeare, a cushion before him, a pen in the right hand, and the left resting on a scroll. Above the entablature are his armorial bearings...
Page 21 - Shakespeare ; an exhibition of fireworks ; and a horse-race for a silver cup. The town was illuminated ; cannon were fired ; and bands of music paraded the streets. The concourse of persons of rank to assist in this poetical festival was so great, that many were not able to procure beds in the town, and are said to have been constrained to sleep in their carriages. The weather was wet and unfavourable, but much good humour prevailed among the parties assembled. The whole of the festivities were afterwards...

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