The History and Proceedings of the House of Lords from the Restoration in 1660 to the Present Time: Containing the Most Remarkable Motions, Speeches, Debates, Orders and Resolutions, Volume 7

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Page xlix - Parliament, with the establishment therein contained, shall be held and observed in all time coming as a fundamental and essential condition of any treaty or union to be concluded betwixt the two kingdoms, without any alteration thereof or derogation thereto in any sort for ever...
Page lxvi - Parliament, and all other records, rolls and registers whatsoever, both public and private, general and particular, and warrants thereof, continue to be kept as they are within that part of the united kingdom now called Scotland ; and that they shall so remain in all time coming, notwithstanding the Union.
Page xlviii - Parliament doth hereby establish and confirm the said true Protestant religion and the worship discipline and government of this Church to continue without any alteration to the people of this land in all succeeding generations...
Page 530 - That an humble addrefs be prefented to his Majefty that he will be gracioufly pleafed to give directions that there be laid...
Page li - Majesty's reign there be such conditions of government settled and enacted, as may secure the honour and sovereignty of this Crown and Kingdom, the freedom, frequency and power of Parliaments, the religion, liberty and trade of the nation, from English or any foreign influence...
Page 400 - It shall be my care strictly to observe and attend to their motions, 'and to adhere to the engagements I am under, in order to the maintaining of the balance of power, and the liberties of Europe...
Page 398 - Romans, were reduced to it by the same means ; and to prevent such a horrid catastrophe is the design of this bill. If people would at all think, if they would consider the consequences of corruption, there would be no occasion, my Lords, for making laws against it. It would appear so horrible, that no man would allow it to approach him. The corrupted ought to consider that they do not...
Page 482 - Temporal, in parliament ailemblcd, beg leave to return your Majefty our humble thanks for your moft gracious fpeech from the throne.
Page 609 - ... their charge with the formality of demanding a permission to be absent, which their commander dares not deny them. Thus, my lords, they leave the care of the troops, and the study of the rules of war, to those unhappy men who have no other claim to elevation than knowledge and bravery, and who, for want of relations in...
Page 448 - Kingdoms, in reiblving to carry on this juft and neceflary War in the moft proper Places, and...

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