Sammlung

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Jun 2, 2011 - Literary Criticism - 634 pages
Originally published in 1903, this collection gathers together the poetry of John Milton in a single volume. The text is carefully edited by William Aldis Wright (1831-1914), a renowned scholar of the time and a Milton specialist. In the preface Wright explains the reasons behind favouring particular editions and various editorial judgements, the end result being an attempt to remain as close to Milton's original vision as possible. There are numerous critical notes, but in accordance with a generally unobtrusive approach, these are contained towards the end of the text. This remains a fine edition that will be of value to anyone with an interest in Milton scholarship and the history of English literature.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

A Paraphrase on Psalm CXIV i
1
Upon the Circumcision
18
Penseroso
31
Lycidas
69
Sonnets page
74
Translations
87
Psalms done into verse 1653 page Psalm I
106
Psalm III
107
Book IX
293
Book X
323
Book XI
352
Book XII
375
Paradise Regained Book I
392
Book III
417
Book IV
428
Samson Agonistes
445

Psalm IV
108
Psalm V
109
Psalm VI
110
Paradise Lost Commendatory Verses
115
Book I
116
H Book III
167
Book IV
186
Book V
213
Book VI
236
Book VII
260
Book VIII
276
Latin Poems De Auctore Testimonia
492
Elegiarum Liber Elegia Prima
496
Elegia Secunda
498
Elegia Tertia
499
Elegia Quarta 5i
501
Elegia Quinta 54
504
Elegia Sexta 58
508
Elegia Septima
511
Epigrammata
514
Notes
547

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

John Milton, English scholar and classical poet, is one of the major figures of Western literature. He was born in 1608 into a prosperous London family. By the age of 17, he was proficient in Latin, Greek, and Hebrew. Milton attended Cambridge University, earning a B.A. and an M.A. before secluding himself for five years to read, write and study on his own. It is believed that Milton read evertything that had been published in Latin, Greek, and English. He was considered one of the most educated men of his time. Milton also had a reputation as a radical. After his own wife left him early in their marriage, Milton published an unpopular treatise supporting divorce in the case of incompatibility. Milton was also a vocal supporter of Oliver Cromwell and worked for him. Milton's first work, Lycidas, an elegy on the death of a classmate, was published in 1632, and he had numerous works published in the ensuing years, including Pastoral and Areopagitica. His Christian epic poem, Paradise Lost, which traced humanity's fall from divine grace, appeared in 1667, assuring his place as one of the finest non-dramatic poet of the Renaissance Age. Milton went blind at the age of 43 from the incredible strain he placed on his eyes. Amazingly, Paradise Lost and his other major works, Paradise Regained and Samson Agonistes, were composed after the lost of his sight. These major works were painstakingly and slowly dictated to secretaries. John Milton died in 1674.

Bibliographic information