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power of religion in counteracting tendencies which sometimes appear to be almost irresistible; and its only effect, in relation to men, is to place them within a larger circle of beneficence. But while the instances in which the advantages of prosperity are far otherwise applied are so numerous, the humble Christian learns to be content, and can deliberately prefer a sanctified adversity, to the fearful probability of being found to abuse the mercies of a different condition.

He looks abroad into the varied field

Of nature, and though poor, perhaps, compar'd
With those whose mansions glitter in his sight,
Calls the delightful scenery all his own.
His are the mountains, and the vallies his,
And the resplendent rivers. His t'enjoy
With a propriety that none can feel,
But who with filial confidence inspired

Can lift to Heaven an unpresumptuous eye,
And smiling say-" My Father made them all."

Are they not his by a peculiar right,

And by an emphasis of interest his,

Whose eye they fill with tears of holy joy,

Whose heart with praise, and whose exalted mind,
With worthy thoughts of that unwearied love
That planned, and built, and still upholds, a world
So clothed with beauty for rebellious man?
Yes-ye may fill your garners, ye that reap
The loaded soil, and ye may waste much good

In senseless riot; but ye will not find

In feast, or in the chase, in song or dance,

A liberty like his, who, unimpeached
Of usurpation, and to no man's wrong,
Appropriates nature as his Father's work,
And has a richer use of yours than you.

COWPER.

In conclusion, it is worthy of careful recollection, that the accidents in our history which have

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ved. Thus it is in the ordinary e; and thus it is, in at least an equal eternal the experience of the Christian. We ever so much exposed to the pressures Prdversity as when we think ourselves most ured against them; and among the most prealent results of prosperity, we may reckon this ominous species of presumption. It is as true of all the evils which belong to the present state, as of the last in the series,-in an hour when we think not they come.

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Methinks if you would know

isitations of calamity

Lect the pious soul, 'tis shown ye there!

Look yonder at that cloud, which through the sky

Sailing alone, doth cross in her career

The rolling moon! I watched it as it came,

And deemed the dark opaque would blot her beamis;
But melting like a wreath of snow, it hangs
In folds of wavy silver round, and clothes
The orb with richer beauties than her own,
Then, passing, leaves her in her light serene.

SOUTHEY.

THE sacred writings abound with exhortations to duty and these are so many proofs of human depravity. There is a need of them, or they would not have been recorded; but man ought not to have needed them. Remember them which suffer adversity, as being yourselves also in the body. Language of this nature implies that there is room to fear, lest the duties to which it refers, obvious as they may seem, should not only be neglected, or imperfectly performed, but wholly forgotten. It may be, that where adversity is the effect, in part of weakness, and in part, perhaps, of more censurable causes, there will often be some difficulty in determining the measure of sympathy that

brought the greatest suffering along with them, have generally come upon us when least expected, and when, in consequence, we were least on our guard against such approaches. They who go down to the sea in ships can tell, that, in this way, the calm is often more destructive than the storm. The traveller, who has escaped unhurt amid the most dangerous passes of the mountain, has frequently incurred material injury in riding listlessly across the plain. When beset with difficulty, or assailed by opposition, we put forth all our vigilance and effort accordingly; but when these are no longer felt, and we begin to relax, the hour of evil has arrived. Thus it is in the ordinary affairs of life; and thus it is, in at least an equal degree, in the experience of the Christian. We are never so much exposed to the pressures of adversity as when we think ourselves most secured against them; and among the most prevalent results of prosperity, we may reckon this ominous species of presumption. It is as true of all the evils which belong to the present state, as of the last in the series,-in an hour when we think not they come.

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CHAP. XIV.

THE CHRISTIAN WARFARE, AS CONNECTED WITH
-ADVERSITY.

Methinks if you would know

How visitations of calamity

Affect the pious soul, 'tis shown ye there!

Look yonder at that cloud, which through the sky

Sailing alone, doth cross in her career

The rolling moon! I watched it as it came,

And deemed the dark opaque would blot her beanis;
But melting like a wreath of snow, it hangs
In folds of wavy silver round, and clothes
The orb with richer beauties than her own,
Then, passing, leaves her in her light serene.

SOUTHEY.

THE sacred writings abound with exhortations to duty and these are so many proofs of human depravity. There is a need of them, or they would not have been recorded; but man ought not to have needed them. Remember them which suffer adversity, as being yourselves also in the body. Language of this nature implies that there is room to fear, lest the duties to which it refers, obvious as they may seem, should not only be neglected, or imperfectly performed, but wholly forgotten. It may be, that where adversity is the effect, in part of weakness, and in part, perhaps, of more censurable causes, there will often be some difficulty in determining the measure of sympathy that

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