Fairy Legends and Traditions of the South of Ireland: The shefro. The cluricaune. The banshee. The phooka. Thierna na oge

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Contents

I
3
II
11
III
18
IV
31
V
39
VI
55
VII
64
VIII
68
XV
175
XVI
178
XVII
188
XVIII
197
XIX
208
XX
241
XXI
250
XXII
264

IX
73
X
90
XI
117
XII
129
XIII
149
XIV
159
XXIII
277
XXIV
287
XXV
295
XXVI
299
XXVII
304
XXVIII
317

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Page 248 - This Puck seems but a dreaming dolt, Still walking like a ragged colt, And oft out of a bush doth bolt, Of purpose to deceive us ; And, leading us, makes us to stray, Long winters nights out of the way, And when we stick in mire and clay, He doth with laughter leave us.
Page 211 - He shall not die, by G — ," cried my uncle Toby. The accusing spirit, which flew up to heaven's chancery with the oath, blushed as he gave it in ; and the recording angel, as he wrote it down, dropped a tear upon the word, and blotted it out for ever.
Page 154 - Wisdom oft has sought me, I scorn'd the lore she brought me. My only books Were woman's looks, And folly's all they've taught me. Her smile when Beauty granted, I hung with gaze enchanted, Like him the sprite, Whom maids by night Oft meet in glen that's haunted.
Page 234 - A near relation of my family," said he, " expired last night in this castle. We disguised our certain expectation of the event from you, lest it should throw a cloud over the cheerful reception which was your due. Now, before such an event happens in this family and castle, the female spectre whom you have seen always is visible. She is believed to be the spirit of a woman of inferior rank, whom one of my ancestors degraded himself by marrying, and whom afterwards, to expiate the dishonour done to...
Page 326 - If we shadows have offended. Think but this, and all is mended, That you have but slumber'd here While these visions did appear. And this weak and idle theme, No more yielding but a dream, Gentles, do not reprehend...
Page 67 - As a beam o'er the face of the waters may glow, While the tide runs in darkness and coldness below, So the cheek may be tinged with a warm sunny smile, Though the cold heart to ruin runs darkly the while.
Page 255 - Where in the world are you going, sir ?' says I to him. ' Hold your tongue, Dan,' says he : 4 mind your own business, and don't be interfering with the business of other people.' 'Faith, this is my business, I think,
Page 261 - Just as we were talking a ship hove in sight, scudding so beautiful before the wind: "Ah! then, sir," said I, "will you drop me on the ship if you please?" '"We are not fair over it," said he. '"We are," said I. '"We are not," said he, "If I dropped you now, you would go splash into the sea.
Page 160 - Success," said the little man ; " and you're heartily welcome, Billy ; but don't think to cheat me as you have done others — out with your purse and pay me like a gentleman." " Is it I pay you ?" said Billy : "could I not just take you up and put you in my pocket as easily as a blackberry ?" " Billy Mac Daniel," said the little man, getting very angry, "you shall be my servant for seven years and a day, and that is the way I will be paid — so make ready to follow me.
Page 285 - On Lough Neagh's bank as the fisherman strays, When the clear, cold eve's declining, He sees the round towers of other days, In the wave beneath him shining! Thus shall memory often, in dreams sublime, Catch a glimpse of the days that are over, Thus, sighing, look through the waves of time For the long-faded glories they cover!

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