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Travellers — for the variety tourist had since breakfast time this morning, and hardly developed into a distinct species that was no more than a dew-bit afield.” at this date - sometimes said in passing, “Then drink, Joseph, and don't rewhen they cast their eyes up to the sign- strain yourself !” said Coggan, handing bearing tree, that artists were fond of him a hooped mug three-quarters full. representing the sign-board hanging thus, Joseph drank for a moderately long but that they themselves had never before time, then for a longer time, saying, as noticed so perfect an instance in actual he lowered the jug, " 'Tis pretty drinking working order. It was near this tree that

- very pretty drinking, and is more than the waggon was standing into which Ga- cheerful on my melancholy errand, so to briel Oak crept on his first journey to speak it.” Weatherbury; but, owing to the dark- " True, drink is a pleasant delight,” ness, the sign and the ino had been un- said Jan, as one who repeated a truism observed.

so familiar to his brain that he hardly The manners of the inn were of the noticed its passage over his tongue; and, old-established type. Indeed, in the lifting the cup, Coggan tilted his head minds of its frequenters they existed as gradually backwards, with closed eyes, unalterable formulæ : e.g.

that his expectant soul might not be di

verted for one instant from its bliss by Rap with the bottom of your pint for more irrelevant surroundings. liquor.

“Well, I must be on again,” said PoorFor tobacco, shout.

grass. “Not but that I should like In calling for the girl in waiting, say, another nip with ye ; but the country “ Maid !"

might lose confidence in me if I was seed Ditto for the landlady, “Old Soul!” here." &c. &c.

“Where be ye trading o't to to-day then,

Joseph ?" It was a relief to Joseph's heart when “ Back to Weatherbury. I've got poor the friendly sign-board came in view, little Fanny Robin in my waggon outside, and, stopping his horse immediately be- and I must be at the churchyard gates at neath it, he proceeded to fulfil an inten- a quarter to five with her.” tion made a long time before. His spirits *Ay – I've heard of it. And so she's were oozing out of him quite. He turned nailed up in parish boards after all, and the horse's head to the green bank, and nobody to pay the bell shilling and the entered the hostel for a mug of ale. grave half-crown.”

Going down into the kitchen of the “The parish pays the grave half-crown, inn, the floor of which was a step below but not the bell-shilling, because the the passage, which in its turn was a step bell's a luxury: but 'a can hardly do below the road outside, what should Jo- without the grave, poor body. However, seph see to gladden his eyes but two cop- I expect our mistress will pay all." per-coloured discs, in the form of the A pretty maid as ever í see! But countenances of Mr. Jan Coggan and Mr. what's yer hurry, Joseph ?. The pore Mark Clark. These owners of the two woman's dead, and you can't bring her to most appreciative throats in the neigh- life, and you may as well sit down combourhood, on this side of respectability, fortable and finish another with us." were now sitting face to face over a three- “I don't mind taking just the merest legged circular table, having an iron rim thimbleful of imagination more with ye, to keep cups and pots from being acci- sonnies. But only a few minutes, bedentally elbowed off ; they might have cause 'tis as 'tis." been said to resemble the setting sun and “Of course, you'll have another drop. the full moon shining vis-à-vis across the A man's twice the man afterwards. You globe.

feel so warm and glorious, and you whop “Why, 'tis neighbour Poorgrass !” and slap at your work without any said Mark Clark. “I'm sure your face trouble, and everything goes on like don't praise your mistress's table, Jo- sticks a-breaking. Too much liquor is seph."

bad, and leads us to that horned man in " I've had a very pale companion for the smoky house; but, after all, many the last five miles," said Joseph, indul- people haven't the gift of enjoying a soak, ging in a shudder toned down by resigna- and since we are highly favoured with a tion. “And to speak the truth, 'twas power that way, we should make the beginning to tell upon me. I assure ye I most o't." ba'n't seed the colour of victuals or drink “ True," said Mark Clark. “ 'Tis a

LIVING AGE. VOL. VIII. 368

and said through the fog, which hung, covenanted mercies are extended towards between them like blown flour,

her, and that she is a member of the flock " Is that Poorgrass with the corpse ? " of Christ.”

Gabriel recognized the voice as that of The parson's words spread into the the parson.

heavy air with a sad yet unperturbed ca“ The corpse is here, sir," said Gabriel. dence, and Gabriel shed an honest tear.

“ I have just been to inquire of Mrs. Bathsheba seemed unmoved. Mr. ThirdTroy if she could tell me the reason of ly then left them, and Gabriel lighted a the delay. I am afraid it is too late lantern. Fetching three other men to now for the funeral to be performed assist him, tliey bore the unconscious truwith proper decency. Have you the ant indoors, placing the coffin on two registrar's certificate?”

benches in the middle of a little sitting* No," said Gabriel. “I expect Poor- room next the hall, as Bathsheba directed. grass has that; and he's at the Buck's Every one except Gabriel Oak then Head.' I forgot to ask him for it.” left the room. He still indecisively lin

“ Then that settles the matter. We'll gered beside the body. He was deeply put off the funeral till to-morrow morn- troubled at the wretchedly ironical aspect ing. The body may be brought on to that circumstances were putting on with the church, or it may be left here at the regard to Troy's wife, and at his own farm and fetched by the bearers in the powerlessness to counteract them. In morning. They waited more than an spite of his careful manæuvring all this hour, and have now gone home.” day, the very worst event that could in

Gabriel had his reasons for thinking any way have happened in connection the latter a most objectionable plan, not with the burial had happened now. Oak withstanding that Fanny had been an imagined a terrible discovery resulting inmate of the farmhouse for several from this afternoon's work that might years in the lifetime of Bathsheba's un-cast over Bathsheba's life a shade which cle. Visions of several unhappy contin- the interposition of many lapsing years gencies which might arise from this delay might but indifferently lighten, and Aitted before him. But his will was not which nothing at all might altogether relaw, and he went indoors to inquire of move. his mistress what were her wishes on the Suddenly, as in a last attempt to save subject. He found her in an unusual Bathsheba from, at any rate, immediate mood : her eyes as she looked up to him anguish, he looked again, as he had were suspicious and perplexed as with looked before, at the chalk writing upon some antecedent thought. Troy had not the coffin-lid. The scrawl was this simyet returned. At first Bathsheba assent-ple one, “ Fanny Robin and child." Gaed with a mien of indifference to his briel took his handkerchief and carefully proposition that they should go on to the rubbed out the two latter words. He church at once with their burden; but then left the room, and went out quietly immediately afterwards, following Ga- by the front door. briel to the gate, she swerved to the extreme of solicitousness on Fanny's account, and desired that the girl might be brought into the house.

Oak argued upon the convenience of leaving her in

From Chambers' Journal. the waggon, just as she lay now, with her

THE LIFE OF FLOWERS. flowers and green leaves about her, merely Nulla planta sine animd (No plant wheeling the vehicle into the coach-house without a soul), Aristotle is said to have till the morning, but to no purpose. “It observed. The proposition can certainly is unkind and unchristian,” she said, “ to not be maintained on scientific grounds ; leave the poor thing in a coach-house all and even the great German poet, who night." *Very well, then," said the parson. hues of a splendour divine,” is obliged at

glorifies the flowers as “ decked with the “And I will arrange that the funeral shall last to address to them the invocation : take place early to-morrow. Perhaps Mrs. Troy is right in feeling that we can

Weep, kindly children of the Spring, not treat a dead fellow-creature too

To you has Heaven a soul denied. thoughtfully. We must remember that Yet, for the imagination and the feelthough she may have erred grievously in ings, there is a sense in which the saying leaving her home, she is still our sister ; is true. We are in the habit of imputing and it is to be believed that God's un-'to flowers a sort of personality, in a much "Don't take on so, shepherd !” said | have b-b-been called a d-d-drunkard in Mark Clark, looking reproachfully at the such a way!” candle, which appeared to possess spe- “ I wish you'd show yourself a man of cial features of interest for his eyes. spirit, and not sit whining there !”

“Nobody can hurt a dead woman," at “ Show myself a man of spirit ? .. length said Coggan, with the precision of Ah, well ! let me take the name of drunka machine. “All that could be done for ard humbly- let me be a man of conher is done — she's beyond us : and why trite knees — let it be! I know that I should a man put himself in a tearing always do say 'Please God’afore I do hurry for lifeless clay that can neither anything, from my getting up to my gofeel nor see, and don't know what you ing down of the same, and I am willing do with her at all? If she'd been alive, to take as much disgrace as belongs to I would have been the first to help her. that holy act. Hah, yes ! ... But not a If she now wanted victuals and drink, i'd man of spirit? Have I ever allowed the pay for it, money down. But she's dead, toe of pride to be lifted against my perand no speed of ours will bring her to son without shouting manfully that I life. The woman's past us — time spent question the right to do so? I enquire upon her is throwed away: why should that query boldly!” we hurry to do what's not required ? “We can't say that you have, Joseph Drink, shepherd, and be friends, for to- Poorgrass,” said Jan, emphatically. morrow we may be like her."

“Never have I allowed such treat"We may,” added Mark Clark, em- ment to pass unquestioned ! Yet the phatically, at once drinking himself to shepherd says in the face of that rich run no further risk of losing his chance testimony that I am not a man of spirit ! by the event alluded to. Jan meanwhile well, let it pass by, and death is a kind merging his additional thoughts of to- friend." morrow in a song:

Gabriel, seeing that neither of the To-mor-row, to-mor-row !

three was in a fit state to take charge of And while peace and plen-ty I find at my

the waggon for the remainder of the jourboard,

ney, made no reply, but, closing the door With a heart free from sick-ness and sor- again upon them, went across to where row,

the vehicle stood, now getting indistinct With my friends will I share what to-day may in the fog and gloom of this mildewy afford,

time. He pulled the horse's head from And let them spread the ta-ble to-mor-row. the large patch of turf it had eaten bare, To-mor-row, to-mor

readjusted the boughs over the coffin, “Do hold thy horning, Jan!” said and 'drove along through the unwholeOak; and turning upon Poorgrass, “ As some night. for you, Joseph, who do your wicked It had gradually become rumoured in deeds in such confoundedly holy ways, the village that the body to be brought you are as drunk as you can stand.” and buried that day was all that was

“No, Shepherd Oak, no! Listen to left of the unfortunate Fanny Robin reason, shepherd. All that's the matter who had followed the Eleventh from with me is the affliction called the mul- Casterbridge to Melchester. But, thanks tiplying eye, and that's how it is I look to Boldwood's reticence and Oak's gen. double to you - I mean you look double erosity, the lover she had followed had to me."

never been

individualized as Troy. * A multiplying eye is a very distress-Gabriel hoped that the whole truth of ing thing,” said Mark Clark.

the matter might not be published till * It always comes on when I have been at any rate the girl had been in her in a public-house a little time," said grave' for a few days, when the interJoseph Poorgrass, meekly. “ Yes, I see posing barriers of earth and time, and a two of every sort, as if I were some holy sense that the events had been someman living in the times of King Noah and what shut into oblivion, would deaden entering into the ark. . . . Y-y-y-yes,"

," the sting that revelation and invidious he added, becoming much affected by remark would have for Bathsheba just the picture of himself as a person thrown now. away, and shedding tears, “I feel too By the time that Gabriel reached the good for England: I ought to have old manor-house, her residence, which lived in Genesis by rights, like the other lay in his way to the church, it was men of sacrifice, and then I shouldn't quite dark. A man came from the gate and said through the fog, which hung, covenanted mercies are extended towards between them like blown four,

her, and that she is a member of the flock “Is that Poorgrass with the corpse ? " of Christ."

Gabriel recognized the voice as that of The parson's words spread into the the parson.

heavy air with a sad yet unperturbed ca“The corpse is here, sir," said Gabriel. dence, and Gabriel shed an honest tear.

“ I have just been to inquire of Mrs. Bathsheba see:ned unmoved. Mr. ThirdTroy if she could tell me the reason of ly then left them, and Gabriel lighted a the delay. I am afraid it is too late lantern. Fetching three other inen to now for the funeral to be performed assist him, they bore the unconscious truwith proper decency: Have you the ant indoors, placing the coffin on two registrar's certificate?

benches in the middle of a little sittingNo," said Gabriel. “I expect Poor-room next the hall, as Bathsheba directed. grass has that; and he's at the • Buck's Every one except Gabriel Oak then Head.' I forgot to ask him for it.”

left the room. He still indecisively lin"Then that settles the matter. We'll gered beside the body. He was deeply put off the funeral till tomorrow morn- troubled at the wretchedly ironical aspect ing. The body may be brought on to that circumstances were putting on with the church, or it may be left here at the regard to Troy's wife, and at his own farm and fetched by the bearers in the powerlessness to counteract them. In morning They waited more than an spite of his careful maneuvring all this hour, and have now gone home.” day, the very worst event that could in

Gabriel had his reasons for thinking any way, have happened in connection the latter a most objectionable plan, not with the burial had happened now. Oak withstanding that Fanny had been an imagined a terrible discovery resulting inmate of the farmhouse for several from this afternoon's work that might years in the lifetime of Bathsheba's un-cast over Bathsheba's life a shade which cle. Visions of several unhappy contin- the interposition of many lapsing years gencies which might arise from this delay might but indifferently lighten, and Aitted before him. But his will was not which nothing at all might altogether re. law, and he went indoors to inquire of move. his mistress what were her wishes on the Suddenly, as in a last attempt to save subject. He found her in an unusual Bathsheba from, at any rate, immediate mood : her eyes as she looked up to him anguish, he looked again, as he had were suspicious and perplexed as with looked before, at the chalk writing upon some antecedent thought. Troy had not the coffin-lid.The scrawl was this simyet returned. At first Bathsheba assent- ple one, Fanny Robin and child." Gaed with a mien of indifference to his briel took his handkerchief and carefully proposition that they should go on to the rubbed out the two latter words. He church at once with their burden; but then left the room, and went out quietly immediately afterwards, following Ga- by the front door. briel to the gate, she swerved to the extreme of solicitousness on Fanny's account, and desired that the girl might be brought into the house.

Oak argued upon the convenience of leaving her in

From Chambers' Journal. the waggon, just as she lay now, with her

THE LIFE OF FLOWERS. flowers and green leaves about her, merely Nulla planta sine animd (No plant wheeling the vehicle into the coach-house without a soul), Aristotle is said to have till the morning, but to no purpose. " It observed. The proposition can certainly is unkind and unchristian,” she said, “ to not be maintained on scientific grounds; leave the poor thing in a coach-house all and even the great German poet, who night."

glorifies the flowers as “ decked with the * Very well, then," said the parson. hues of a splendour divine,” is obliged at “ And will arrange that the funeral shall last to address to them the invocation : take place early to-morrow. Perhaps Mrs. Troy is right in feeling that we can

Weep, kindly children of the Spring, not treat a dead fellow-creature too

To you has Heaven a soul denied. thoughtfully. We must remember that Yet, for the imagination and the feelthough she may have erred grievously in ings, there is a sense in which the saying leaving her home, she is still our sister ;, is true. We are in the habit of imputing and it is to be believed that God's un-'to flowers a sort of personality, in a much higher degree than to other inanimate of the woods. Atropa Belladonna! It things. It is not only that the love we bear suggests some Florentine countess of the then for their beauty, their frailty, and middle ages with dark, alluring eyes, who tenderness, lifts them above the category "wooed but to destroy,” subtle, poisonof things, to rank them in a higher; they ous perfumes exhaling from her luxuriant have so much more to say to the feelings, hair! and say it so much more specially, than But to descend from the realms of fancy any other class of natural objects, that to those of fact, there really are many we get to speak of them in terms de- phenomena connected with the life of scriptive not merely of form, size, colour, plants closely resembling those of animal, bearing, &c., but in such as attribute to not to say of conscious existence. The them personal character, human qualities pimpernel, prescient of the coming showand passions. Each one seems to breathe er, closes its petals an hour or two bea sentiment and speak a language of its fore it descends ; the sensitive plant own. We need not go to the poets for shrinks from a foreign touch, and huddles proof and illustration of our point; the lan- its pairs of leaflets together, as if cowerguage of common life will supply us with ing under the presence of a foe; the both. It does not restrict itself to such water-lilies, at the approach of evening, epithets as tall, stately, slender, and the draw down their white or yellow heads like, in referring to the flowers; we hear of beneath the surface, and so await the rethe flaunting foxglove, the lowly violet, the turn of day. Such phenomena are usumodest daisy, the deadly nightshade, the ally referred to automatic movement, weeping willow. Sometimes the name But call them what we will, they are the itself, without the addition of any adjec- first faint suggestions, the dim prophetive, bears witness to some single, dis- cies of that fully developed, glorious continct, and powerful impression of quali- sciousness, of which the complex and ties in the plant, other than those which magnificent phenomena of intellect and appeal to the senses. Day's-eye, eye- will are part and parcel. The plant-life bright, nightshade, are all of this class. is but the life of man in its elementary We know not how and when such names and undeveloped state. came into being; but we all feel their fit- We might go a little farther, without ness. They must have had some single losing hold of the ground of safe speculainventor, we suppose, but the universal tion. The flowers are planted by the acceptation of them is a proof of the roots fast down in the earth; yet, through sameness and universality of the impres- the stiffest clay and marl, winding round sion made by each individual flower rocks, displacing stones, they struggle upon the common heart and imagination. upwards to the light of day. By a similar Nay, sometimes even Science itself yields necessity, man, too, climbs upwards to the fascination, and in reconstructing towards the ideal. The soul is unconfloral nomenclature for its own purposes, tented with what is low and dark, and, like instead of conferring upon a plant a name the plant, struggles towards the heaven founded upon some characteristic pecul- of truth, and the light of God's presence. iarity (differentia, as the logicians say), Once more, how nearly the plantwhich shall serve as a basis for classifica- lise resembles our own in its periods, tion into order, genus, species, it does but its seasons, its epochs ! Like us, they translate the old poetical name, or embody have their period of childhood, in which the conception it conveys under a new they put forth buds only; in youth, image. Thus the magnificent plant with they attain to fuller beauty and strength; the lurid blossoms, and the black, lus- in the 'ripe autumn of their days, they cious, poisonous, berries, which pre- bring their fruit to perfection; and then sented itself to the imagination of our fade away. As their vital energies, beforefathers as some baleful shadow of tween the beginning and end of their night, beneath which "all life expires,” lives, first grow, and then decline, so each becomes in scientific terminology Atropa individual day witnesses a corresponding Belladonna, which we shall venture to waxing and waning. With sunrise, they translate as “Fate-fraught, beautiful awaken, bloom airily throughout the day'; Damsel.” Science recognizes the truth and, like us, shut their eyes wearily toof the idea expressed by the old name, gether, when the night is come. but does justice to the incomparable At the approach of Night all Nature beauty of this the largest of the English puts on an attitude of expectation. A herbaceous plants (not excepting the bur- deep silence settles down on lands, and dock), in size and aspect the real queen 'woods, and waters. Hushed are all the

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