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primarily with the English word or phrase, and afterwards with its Latin equivalent. In particular it is thought that by drawing constant attention to certain small but important English words, as' and,' that,'' this,' &c., and to the English Present Participle in -ing, a practical familiarity with some of the main differences between the treatment of English and Latin sentences may be secured from the outset.

The book is not to be understood as furnishing a complete introduction to the highest Latin Prose Composition. Its general scope may be gathered from the nature of the Exercises in Part II. These consist of extracts from English authors which have been set in Army and Civil Service Examinations, or in the Pass Examinations of the University, and are mostly historical pieces, requiring to be treated in the style of Cæsar or Livy, and presenting no great difficulty.

Although I hope and believe that these rules and exercises will furnish useful assistance to the particular class of boys for whom they are intended, I can scarcely claim any originality in regard to the actual information given. Here and there, indeed, I have ventured to supply some point of detail not fully brought under notice by the standard authorities on Latin Prose Composition; in particular I have been unable to find any exhaustive collection of hints on the rendering of English Epithets into Latin, and I have been compelled therefore to treat the matter at somewhat unusual length (see § 117). But on the whole I have been contented to follow accepted opinions, and to attempt little beyond making the explanations as clear and intelligible as the nature of the subject

would admit. The embellishment of nearly every rule with at least one, and in many cases more than one example from an actual Latin author is a feature which will perhaps be better appreciated by teachers than by boys; still, even the latter may perhaps be roused to some degree of interest in the subject by constantly stumbling. upon old acquaintances, nearly all the Examples being selected from the books most commonly read in the Middle Forms of schools, viz. Cæsar B. G. i-iii, Livy i, ii, and the De Amicitia and De Senectute of Cicero. The only other books from which examples are drawn to any extent are Cæsar B. G. vii, and Cicero Pro Milone; these were selected not as furnishing exceptionally remarkable examples of Latin idiom, but because I happened to be reading them with a class when the writing of the book was in progress.

Information upon elementary points not explained in this book will be found in the Clarendon Press Latin Grammar, to which reference is made throughout, and for the convenience of those who use the Public Schools Latin Primer a reference table has been added, giving the corresponding paragraphs of that book.

My best thanks are due to those who have assisted me in the work, and especially to the Rev. E. D. Stone, late of Eton, who has kindly looked through the whole of the rules, and has given much valuable help. Corrections and emendations from all who use the work will greatly oblige.

JOHN BARROW ALLEN. CHELTENHAM,

December, 1884.

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VIII. The same (continued) . . . . . . 18

§ 22. Utrum ....an . . . . . . 18

§ 23. Future Subjunctive . . . . . . 19

IX. The same (continued) , .

§ 24. What . . .

§ 25. Oblique Questions explanatory of hoc, id, illud

X. Oblique Command . . . . . . . 21

§ 26. Oblique Command

and

.

.

.

. . . . .

$ 27. Omission of ut. . . . . . . . 23

XI. Subordinate Clauses in Oratio Obliqua . . . . 24

§ 28. Rule for Subordinate Clauses in Oratio Obliqua . 24

XII. On Speeches reported in Oratio Obliqua . ..

$ 29. Oratio Recta and Obliqua . . . . .

$ 30. Rule for Speeches in Oratio Obliqua. . . 26

$ 31. Pronouns in Reported Speech . . . . 27

$ 32. Vocative Case . . . . ..

XIII. The same (continued)

$ 33. Introduction of Reported Speech .

$ 34. Differences of Latin and English usage

XIV. The Concords. Conditional Sentences

$ 35. Irregularities of Concord . .

31

§ 36. Partitive Adjectives . . . .

$ 37. Attraction of the Demonstrative .

§ 38. Conditional Sentences . .

$ 39. Shorter Rule for Conditional Sentences

$ 40. Conditional Clauses explanatory of hoc, id, illud

XV. The Relative Pronoun . . . . . .

$ 41. Uses of the Relative . .

$ 42. Parentheses after the Relative . . . . 38

$ 43. Subordinate Clauses in Future Time . . . 38

XVI. The same (continued) . . . . . 39

9. 44. Relative for Demonstrative . . . . 39

§ 45. Oratio Obliqua in Narratives should be continuous 41

XVII. The same (continued)

8 26. Relative preceding Antecedent

6. Relative preceding Antecedent . . . . 42

§ 47. Examples of Explanatory and Restrictive Relative 43

XVIII. The same (continued) . . . . . . 44

$ 48. Qui Continuative, how treated in Oratio Obliqua 44

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