The Connoisseur, Volume 15

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Hearst Corporation, 1906 - Art
 

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Page 227 - Though thou shouldest bray a fool in a mortar among wheat with a pestle, yet will not his foolishness depart from him.
Page 236 - His gardens next your admiration call, On every side you look, behold the wall! No pleasing intricacies intervene, No artful wildness to perplex the scene: Grove nods at grove, each alley has a brother, And half the platform just reflects the other.
Page 210 - I will report no other wonder but this, that though I lived with him, and knew him from a child, yet I never knew him other than a man : with such staidness of mind, lovely and familiar gravity, as carried grace and reverence above greater years. His talk ever of knowledge, and his very play tending to enrich his mind...
Page 60 - Captains are to look to their particular line as their rallying point. But, in case signals can neither be seen or perfectly understood, no captain can do very wrong if he places his ship alongside that of an enemy.
Page 213 - In which sad progress, passing along by the rest of the army, where his uncle the general was, and being thirsty with excess of bleeding, he called for drink which was presently brought him ; but as he was putting the bottle to his mouth, • he saw a poor soldier carried along, who had eaten his last at the same feast, ghastly casting up his eyes at the bottle. Which Sir Philip perceiving, took it from his head before he drank, and delivered it to the poor man with these words, Thy necessity is...
Page 59 - Command will, after my intentions are made known to him, have the entire direction of his Line to make the attack upon the Enemy, and to follow up the blow until they are captured or destroyed.
Page 59 - Something must be left to chance ; nothing is sure in a sea fight beyond all others. Shot will carry away the masts and yards of friends as well as foes, but I look with confidence to a victory before the van of the enemy could succour their rear, and then that the British fleet would...
Page 59 - I have, therefore, made up my mind to keep the fleet in that position of sailing (with the exception of the first and second in command) that the order of sailing is to be the order of battle, placing the fleet in two lines of sixteen ships each, with an advanced squadron of eight of the fastest sailing twodecked ships, which will always make, if wanted, a line of twentyfour sail, on whichever line the commander-in-chief may direct.
Page 117 - French designs (fig. 24) which owes so much to the state patronage, contrasts with the absence of corresponding provision in England and was noticed early in the i8th century by Bishop Berkeley. " How," he asks, " could France and Flanders have drawn so much money from other countries for figured silk, lace and tapestry, if they had not had their academies of design?
Page 59 - I have no fears as to the result. The second in command will in all possible things direct the movements of his line by keeping them as compact as the nature of the circumstances will admit.

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