The history of the Rebellion and civil wars in England, Volume 1, Part 1

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Page xxxvii - GLORY be to God on high, and on earth peace, good will towards men. We praise thee, we bless thee, we worship thee, we glorify thee, we give thanks to thee for thy great glory, O Lord God, heavenly King, God the Father Almighty.
Page 404 - Thus fell the greatest subject in power, and little inferior to any in fortune, that was at that time in any of the three kingdoms; who could well remember the time, when he led those people, who then pursued him to his grave. He was a man of great parts, and extraordinary endowments of nature ; not unadorned with some addition of art and learning, though that again was more improved and illustrated by the other...
Page 28 - (an appellation he always used of and towards the duke,) 'who have a great mind to go by post into Spain, to fetch home the infanta, and will have but two more in their company, and have chosen you for one. What think you of the journey...
Page 91 - ... he paid much too dear for his wife's fortune by taking her person into the bargain...
Page 93 - At supper one of them drank a health to the lord steward : upon which, another of them said, ' that he believed his Lord was very merry,' for he had now out-lived the day, which his tutor, Sandford, had prognosticated upon his nativity he would not outlive ; but he had done it now, for that was his birthday, which had completed his age to fifty years.' The next morning, by the time they came to Colebrook, they met with the news of his death.
Page 289 - ... very weighty speaker ; and after he had heard a full debate, and observed how the House was like to be inclined, took up the argument, and shortly, and clearly, and craftily so stated it, that he commonly conducted it to the conclusion he desired ; and if he found he could not do that, he was never without the dexterity to divert the debate to another time, and to prevent the determining any thing in the negative, which might prove inconvenient in the future.
Page 69 - The person replied, as he had done before, that he should never find rest, till he should perform what he required, and therefore he were better to dispatch it; that the access to his son was known to be very easy; and that few men waited long for him, and for the gaining him credit, he would tell him two or three particulars, which he charged him never to mention to any person living, but to the duke himself; and he should no sooner hear them, but he would believe all the rest he should say; and...
Page 56 - If he had an immoderate ambition, with which he was charged, and is a weed (if it be a weed) apt to grow in the best soils ; it doth not appear that it was in his nature, or that he brought it with him to the court, but rather found it there, and was a garment necessary for that air.
Page 16 - King James reigned at that time ; and though he was a prince of more learning and knowledge than any other of that age, and really delighted more in books, and in the conversation of learned men; yet, of all wise men living, he was the most delighted and taken with handsome persons, and with fine clothes.
Page 174 - And the truth is, there was so little curiosity either in the court, or the country, to know any thing of Scotland, or what was done there, that when the whole nation was solicitous to know what passed weekly in Germany and Poland, and all other parts of Europe, no man ever inquired what was doing in Scotland, nor had that kingdom a place or mention in one page of any gazette...

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