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Books Books 1 - 10 of 153 on When the legislative and executive powers are united in the same person, or in the....
" When the legislative and executive powers are united in the same person, or in the same body of magistrates, there can be no liberty ; because apprehensions may arise, lest the same monarch or senate should enact tyrannical laws, to execute them in a... "
Cobbett's Weekly Political Register - Page 623
edited by - 1810
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The Political Writings of John Dickinson, Esquire: Late President ..., Volume 2

John Dickinson - United States - 1801
...one man need not be afraid of another. When the power of making laws and the power of executing them, are united in the same person, or in the same body of magistrates, there can be no liberty ; because apprehensions may arise, lest the same monarch or senate should enact tyrannical laws, to execute them...
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The Eloquence of the British Senate: Being a Selection of the Best ..., Volume 2

William Hazlitt - Great Britain - 1809
...subject. It was so remarkably to the point, that he would quote it. That great man observes, " When the legislative and executive powers are united in...of magistrates, there can be no liberty ; because apprehensions may arise lest the same monarch or senate should enact tyrannical laws to execute them...
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Cobbett's Political Register, Volume 17

Great Britain - 1810
...government be so constituted " as that one man be not afraid of another. " But." says Montesquieu, " when the " legislative and executive powers are '• united...of magistrates, there can be ' no Liberty ; because apprehensions ' may arise, lest the same monarch or ' senate should enact tyrannical laws, to ' execute...
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The Federalist: On the New Constitution

Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay - Constitutional history - 1817 - 477 pages
...reasons on which Montesquieu grounds his maxim, are & further demonstration of his meaning. " When the legislative " and executive powers are united in the same person or body,'' says he, " there can be no liberty, because apprehensions may " arise lest the same monarch...
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The Federalist, on the New Constitution, Written in the Year 1788, by Mr ...

James Madison, John Jay - Constitutional law - 1818 - 671 pages
...reasons on which Montesquieu grounds his maxim, are a further demonstration of his meaning. " When " the legislative and executive powers are united in the " same person or body," says he, " there can be no " liberty, because apprehensions may arise lest the same tl monarch...
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The Spirit of Laws, Volumes 1-2

Charles de Secondat baron de Montesquieu - Jurisprudence - 1823
...liberty, it is requisite the government be so constituted as one man needs not be afraid oi another. When the legislative and executive powers are united in...person, or in the same body of magistrates, there can he no liberty ; because apprehensions may arise, lest the same monarch or senate should enact tyrannical...
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Journals of the American Congress from 1774-1788: in four volumes

United States. Continental Congress, United States. Continental Congress. Committee of the States - United States - 1823
...one man need not be afraid of another. When the power of making laws and the power of executing them, are united in the same person, or in the same body of magistrates, there can be no liberty ; because apprehensions may arise, lest the same monarch or senate, should enact tyrannical laws, to execute...
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Paley's Moral and Political Philosophy

William Paley - Ethics - 1835 - 298 pages
...principle generally acceded to 1 And the following reasons for it are given by Montesquieu : " When the legislative and executive powers are united in the same person or body, there can be no liberty ; because apprehensions may arise lest the same monarch or senate should...
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Tracts on law, government, and other political subjects, collected and ed ...

Tracts - 1836
...requisite that the government be so constituted, as that one man need not be afraid of another. •" When the legislative and executive powers are united in...of magistrates, there can be no liberty ; because apprehensions may arise lest the same monarch, or senate, should enact tyrannical laws, or execute...
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The Federalist: On the New Constitution, Written in the Year 1788

Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay - Constitutional law - 1837 - 500 pages
...Montesquieu.was guided, it may clearly be inferred, that in saying, " there can be no liberty, " where the legislative and executive powers are united in the "same person, or body of magistrates;" or, " if the power of "judging, be not separated from the legislative and executive...
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