Korean American Women: From Tradition to Modern Feminism

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1998 - Social Science - 298 pages

Emphasizing sociopolitical and cultural behaviors, this collection provides broad insight into the diverse experiences and perspectives of Korean American women in the light of feminism. In their discussions, the authors focus on the status and progress of Korean American women in contemporary society. Twenty-one selections examine the collective experience and Western feminist issues from minority feminist perspectives. The content is interdisciplinary and raises many thought-provoking, seldom-discussed issues. This book will be of interest to students and faculty in sociology, feminist and women's studies, ethnic studies, and Asian studies.

 

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Contents

A WomenCentered Perspective on Korean American Women Today
3
A Critical Feminist Inquiry in a Multicultural Context
11
The Social Reality of Korean American Women Toward Crashing with the Confucian Ideology
23
A PROFILE OF KOREAN WOMEN AND MEN IN THE UNITED STATES
35
Demographic and Socioeconomic Characteristics of Korean American Women and Men
37
Demographic Characteristics and Trends of Post1965 Korean Immigrant Women and Men
45
Attitudes Toward Ethnic Identity Marriage and Familial Life among Women of Korean Descent in the United States Japan and Korea
65
KOREAN AMERICAN WOMEN WORKING OUTSIDE OF THE FAMILY
73
MARRIAGE AND FAMILY
149
Separation and Divorce among Korean Immigrant Families
151
The Domestic Violence against Women in Korean Immigrant Families Cultural Psychological and Socioeconomic Perspectives
161
Korean American Mothers Parenting Styles and Adolescent Behavior
175
Life Satisfaction of the Korean American Elderly
193
MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES
207
The Mental Health of Korean American Women
209
Korean Womens HwaByung Clinical Issues and Implications for Treatment
225

Work Status Conjugal Power Relations and Marital Satisfaction among Korean Immigrant Married Women
75
The Burden of Labor on Korean American Wives in and outside the Family
89
Family and Work Roles of Korean Immigrant Wives and Related Experiences
103
KOREAN AMERICAN IDENTITY
113
Searching for and Defining a Korean American Identity in a Multicultural Society
115
Intraethnic Interracial and Interethnic Marriages among Korean American Women
127
Ethnic Identities Reflected in Value Orientation of Two Generations of Korean American Women
139
ISSUES FOR THE FUTURE
235
Korean Feminist and Human Rights Politics The ChongshindaeJugunianfu Comfort Women Movement
237
Revisioning of Family Reunions A Case of Korean American Women and Their Families Separated by War
255
Modern Feminist Issues Facing Korean American Women A Global Perspective
269
Index
291
About the Editors and Contributors
295
Copyright

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Page 12 - Millett's definition is classic: our society ... is a patriarchy. The fact is evident at once if one recalls that the military, industry, technology, universities, science, political offices, finances — in short, every avenue of power within the society, including the coercive force of the police, is entirely in male hands.
Page 12 - ... have been made for us and not by us. It means that our experience has not been represented in the making of our culture. There is a gap between where we are and the means we have to express and act. It means that the concerns, interests, experiences forming 'our...
Page 14 - revolutionary salt" makes these headliner generalities about "common oppression" with others-but let us state unequivocally that, with few exceptions, the American white woman has had a better opportunity to live a free and fulfilling life, both mentally and physically, than any other group in the United States, with the exception of her white husband.
Page 16 - Instead, it seems to me that the critical feminist position must always involve two moves. The first is the systematic criticism of the operations of categorical difference, the exposure of the kinds of exclusions and inclusions - the hierarchies - it constructs, and a refusal of their ultimate "truth.
Page 11 - The principle that women should have political, economic, and social rights equal to those of men.

About the author (1998)

YOUNG I. SONG is Professor in the Department of Sociology and Social Services at California State University, Hayward. She contributed to Seeking Common Ground (Greenwood, 1992).

AILEE MOON is Associate Professor in the Department of Social Welfare in the School of Public Policy at UCLA.

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