Francis Bacon (Lord Verulam): A Critical Review of His Life and Character with Selections from His Writings

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T. Fisher Unwin, 1888 - Authors, English - 227 pages
 

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Page 258 - Reading maketh a full man ; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man; and, therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory ; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit : * Curiously, ie very attentively. and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, * to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise ; poets witty ; the mathematics subtile ; natural philosophy deep; moral, grave; logic and rhetoric, able to contend...
Page 193 - Certainly, it is heaven upon earth, to have a man's mind move in charity, rest in providence, and turn upon the poles of truth.
Page 193 - It 20 is a pleasure to stand upon the shore and to see ships tossed upon the sea; a pleasure to stand in the window of a castle and to see a battle and the adventures thereof below: but no pleasure is comparable to the standing upon the vantage ground of truth...
Page 197 - It is as natural to die as to be born; and to a little infant, perhaps, the one is as painful as the other. He that dies in an earnest pursuit, is like one that is wounded in hot blood ; who, for the time, scarce feels the hurt ; and therefore a mind fixed and bent upon somewhat that is good, doth avert the dolours of death ; but, above all, believe it, the sweetest canticle is, '' Nunc dimittis" when a man hath obtained worthy ends and expectations.
Page 194 - ... in coin of gold and silver, which may make the metal work the better, but it embaseth it: for these winding and crooked courses are the goings of the serpent; which goeth basely upon the belly and not upon the feet. There is no vice that doth so cover a man with shame, as to be found false and perfidious...
Page 235 - Magna civitas, magna solitudo'; because in a great town friends are scattered, so that there is not that fellowship, for the most part, which is in less neighbourhoods: but we may go further, and affirm most truly, that it is a mere and miserable solitude to want true friends, without which the world is but a wilderness...
Page 266 - Let not judges also be so ignorant of their own right as to think there is not left to them, as a principal part of their office, a wise use and application of laws. For they may remember what the apostle saith of a greater law than theirs : Nos scimus quia lex bona est, modo guts ea utatur legitime f We know that the law is good, if a man use it lawfully].
Page 258 - So if a man's wit be wandering, let him study the mathematics ; for in demonstrations, if his wit be called away never so little, he must begin again. If his wit be not apt to distinguish or find differences, let him study the schoolmen ; for they are cymini sectores. If he be not apt to beat over matters, and to call up one thing to prove and illustrate another, let him study the lawyers
Page 208 - So as a man may have a quarrel* to marry when he will. But yet he* was reputed one of the wise men, that made answer to the question, when a man should marry, — A young man not yet, an elder man not at all.
Page 220 - I HAD rather believe all the fables in the legend, and the Talmud, and the Alcoran, than that this universal frame is without a mind ; and, therefore, God never wrought miracles to convince atheism, because his ordinary works convince it.

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