Mysteries of Magic

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Aug 1, 2005 - Fiction - 364 pages
It is probable that the professional magician was originally one who, in the course of the evolution of society by birth, study and practice, acquired a powerful influence over his fellows. -C.J.S. Thompson, Chapter 1: The Genesis of Magic In this tremendously informative and entertaining sourcebook, first published in 1927, an historian of the occult introduces us to the magic traditions of the ancients, including the Babylonians, Egyptians, Celts, Arabs, Hindu, and Chinese, and then explores the many practices and powers attributed to the magician. Packed with tidbits on demonology and divination, crystal gazing, pentacles and perfumes, magical numbers, grimoires and magical manuscripts, and much more, this is a treat for fans of fantasy and students of the mysterious alike. British writer CHARLES JOHN SAMUEL THOMPSON (1862-1943) was the curator of the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons of England and author of a number of histories of the strange and the supernatural, including The Lure and Romance of Alchemy, The Mystery and Lore of Monsters, Poisons and Poisoners, The Quacks of Old London, and The Hand of Destiny.

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Contents

I
1
II
9
III
24
IV
33
V
46
VI
61
VII
74
VIII
85
XVIII
181
XIX
187
XX
196
XXI
203
XXII
215
XXIII
229
XXIV
241
XXV
256

IX
108
X
118
XI
133
XII
137
XIII
142
XIV
151
XV
157
XVI
167
XVII
176
XXVI
262
XXVII
273
XXVIII
287
XXIX
298
XXX
304
XXXI
315
XXXII
317
Copyright

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Page 22 - ... in another, so that some never almost depart from some particular houses, as though they were their proper mansions, making in them sundry noises, rumours, mockeries, gawds and jests, without doing any harme at all, and some have heard them play at gitterns and Jews...
Page 14 - ... between five and six years old, and seemingly healthy, he was so far from being able to walk or stand, that he could not so much as move any one joint; his limbs were vastly long for his age, but smaller than...
Page 124 - The man died by the hand of the executioner for stealing, and his relict has increased the report she brought with her for witchery. Her familiar Spirit is a deformed thing with many feet, black of colour, rough with hair, the bigness of a cat, the name of it unknown.
Page 70 - A man also or woman that hath a familiar spirit, or that is a wizard, shall surely be put to death : they shall stone them with stones ; their blood shall be upon them.
Page 143 - For the king of Babylon stood at the parting of the way, at the head of the two ways, to use divination: he made his arrows bright, he consulted with images, he looked in the liver.
Page 129 - It is almost needless to add that a pardon was procured for her. And yet, frightful to think, after all this, in 1716, Mrs. Hicks and her daughter, aged nine, were hanged at Huntingdon for selling their souls to the devil, and raising a storm by pulling off their stockings and making a lather of soap...
Page 40 - They are as horses reared amid the hills, The Evil Ones of Ea ; Throne-bearers to the gods are they, They stand in the highway to befoul the path ; Evil are they, evil are they ! Seven are they, seven are they, Twice seven are they...
Page 11 - ... in green, to which purpose they do in the night steal hempen stalks from the fields where they grow, to convert them into horses, as the story goes.

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