History of the Life and Times of Edmund Burke, Volume 3

Front Cover
Chapman and Hall, 1860
 

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Contents

Dismissal of the Coalition Ministry
53
CHAPTER XXXIV
61
Miscalculations of Veteran Politicians
68
Burke on Pitts India Bill
78
Burkes Representation to the King
88
Abandons his meditated Impeachment of Sir Elijah Impey
102
His Conduct to the Players
108
Burke at the Deathbed of Johnson
116
The Nabob of Arcots Debts
123
Burkes Humanity
130
Burke gives notice of his intentions to bring forward his Charges
136
William Eden deserts the Coalition
143
The Appearance of Hastings in the House of Commons
152
THE GREAT ACCUSER IN WESTMINSTER HALL
176
Commencement of the Trial in Westminster Hall
182
Windham and Miss Burney
191
The Tactics of Hastingss Lawyers
200
Burke and Pitt
207
A vexatious Neighbour
213
CHAPTER XXXVII
219
His Violent Speeches
225
Burke meditates Retiring from Parliament
232
Again excluded from the Whig List of Cabinet Ministers
241
Declares that Hastings murdered Nundcomar
253
Burke supports Wilberforces Resolutions against the Slave Trade
260
CHAPTER XXXVIII
266
Barke advises Fox to conciliate the Dissenters
275
His Letters 738
277
Proceedings of the Revolution Society and Constitutional Society
282
Assisted by his Son
288
Sheridans Attack on Burke
298
Philip Francis
304
Frames a Test of his
312
CHAPTER XXXIX
326
Burkes Observations on the English Revolution of 1688
332
Burkes Letter on that Expression to John Gifford
339
The Prophetic Wisdom of the Conclusion of The Reflections
346
Louis the Sixteenth
352
SEPARATION
362
His Resolution
368
Follows up his former Motion
375
Letter to a Member of the National Assembly
382
Burkes Feelings at the Adjournment for the Easter Holydays
388
Burke and Mr Curwen 397
397
Commanded to retire from Parliament
403
Letters to his copyist Swift 407
407
George the Thirds Admiration of the Work
414
Burkes Affection for William
472
General Agreement with his Sentiments
479
Burke writes his Heads for Consideration on the Present State
485
Alarm at the Conduct of the Jacobins
491
Another Scene in the House
497
What became of the Dagger
503
His Solemn Declaration when the War was begun
510
Foxs Censure on Burke
518
Fox recommends the Punishment of the Archbishop
523
His Reception at Oxford
529
Burke not happy
533
Burkes Remarks on the Policy of the Allies
540
Burkes Family at the close of 1793
546
Death of his brother Richard
552
Sheridans inveterate Attacks on Burke
558
Important Questions which it raised
564
Thurlows Rage
570
Laws Epigram
577
The Speakers Address on Thanking the Managers
581
The Sickroom at Cromwell House i
588
His Character
595
Makes out his Will
603
Burkes State of Mind on accepting it
610
Meeting of Parliament
618
The Last Scene of the Impeachment in Westminster Hall
624
CHAPTER XLIV
630
In the Fields
636
Painful Situation of Mrs Haviland
638
Burkes Opposite Feelings
644
Burkes Correspondence with Laurence
650
Spirit of Burkes Letter
656
Burkes Household
663
At Bath
670
Written under the Sense of Impending Death
680
Burke and Canning
684
His Strength Declining
689
Burkes last Christmas Day
690
Unauthorized Publication of the Observations on the Conduct
697
Appalling Condition of the Country
708
Her Disposal of the Property defended
715
Burkes Political Philosophy strictly a Moral Philosophy
723
The Principle on which great men are to be judged
731
Richard Burke and his Transactions in India Stock
740
Was his Prosecution of Hastings really a Defeat ?
746
The Memory of Burke needs no Monument
752
467
762

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Page 588 - His praise, ye Winds, that from four quarters blow, Breathe soft or loud ; and, wave your tops, ye Pines, With every plant, in sign of worship wave.
Page 446 - If a great change is to be made in human affairs, the minds of men be fitted to it; the general opinions and feelings will draw that way. Every fear, every hope will forward it; and then they who persist in opposing this mighty current in human affairs, will appear rather to resist the decrees of Providence itself, than the mere designs of men.
Page 416 - So spake the seraph Abdiel, faithful found, Among the faithless faithful only he; Among innumerable false unmoved, Unshaken, unseduced, unterrified, His loyalty he kept, his love, his zeal ; Nor number nor example with him wrought To swerve from truth, or change his constant mind, Though single.
Page 304 - The mischief you are going to do yourself, is to my apprehension, palpable. It is visible. It will be audible. I snuff it in the wind. I taste it already. I feel it in every sense; and so will you hereafter...
Page 358 - Not one glance of compassion, not one commiserating reflection that I can find throughout his book, has he bestowed on those who lingered out the most wretched of lives, a life without hope in the most miserable of prisons. It is painful to behold a man employing his talents to corrupt himself. Nature has been kinder to Mr. Burke than he is to her. He is not affected by the reality of distress touching his heart, but by the showy resemblance of it striking his imagination. He pities the plumage,...
Page 365 - I impeach him in the name of the Commons of Great Britain in parliament assembled, whose parliamentary trust he has betrayed. I impeach him in the name of all the Commons of Great Britain, whose national character he has dishonored. I impeach him in the name of the people of India, whose laws...
Page 149 - O, for a muse of fire, that would ascend The brightest heaven of invention ! A kingdom for a stage, princes to act, And monarchs to behold the swelling scene ! Then should the warlike Harry, like himself, Assume the port of Mars ; and, at his heels, Leash'd in like hounds, should famine, sword, and fire, Crouch for employment.

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