History of the Cotton Manufacture in Great Britain, Volume 1

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H. Fisher, R. Fisher, and P. Jackson, 1835 - Cotton growing - 544 pages

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Page 42 - ... into Ireland to sell: Neither doth their industry rest here, for they buy cotton wool in London, that comes first from Cyprus and Smyrna, and at home worke the same, and perfect it into fustians...
Page 16 - And all the women that were wisehearted did spin with their hands, and brought that which they had spun, both of blue, and of purple, and of scarlet, and of fine linen. 26 And all the women whose heart stirred them up in wisdom spun goats
Page 38 - Man goeth forth to his work and to his labour, until the evening ;" and then " the night cometh, in which no man can work.
Page 42 - ... a convenient stock of flax, hemp, wool, thread, iron, and other necessary ware and stuff to set the poor on work, and also competent sums of money for and towards the necessary relief of the lame, impotent, old, blind, and such other among them being poor and not able to work, and...
Page 20 - Them hath he filled with wisdom of heart to work all manner of work of the engraver. And of the cunning workman and of the embroiderer, in blue and in purple, in scarlet and in fine linen and of the weaver, even of them that do any work and of those that devise cunning work.
Page 62 - had by great study and long application invented a new piece of machinery, never before found out, practised, or used, for the making of weft or yarn from cotton, flax, and wool ; which would be of great utility to a great many manufacturers, as well as to his Majesty's subjects in general, by employing a great number of poor people in working the said machinery, and by making the said weft or yarn much superior in quality to any heretofore manufactured or made.
Page 108 - In 1767, an eight-handed spinster sprung from the genius of Hargreaves; and the jenny, with still increasing powers, made its way into common use, in spite of all opposition. Two years afterwards, the more wonderful invention of Wyatt, which claims a much earlier origin, but which had disappeared, like a river that sinks into a subterraneous channel, and now rose again under the fortunate star of Arkwright, claimed yet higher admiration, as founded ou principles of more extensive application.
Page 43 - ... whereby not only the better sort of men are employed but also the very children by their own labour can maintain themselves. There are besides all kinds of foreign merchandise bought and returned by the merchants of the town, amounting to the sum of many thousands of pounds weekly.
Page 48 - Feather shall not particularly describe and ascertain the nature of the said invention and in what manner the same is to be performed by an instrument in writing...
Page 64 - Evans) was informed that his client, before leaving Lancashire, had sold some jennies to obtain clothing for his children (of whom he had six or seven) ; and in consequence of this, which was true, the attorney gave up the actions in despair of obtaining a verdict.

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