A Treatise of Civil Power in Ecclesiastical Causes: Shewing that it is Not Lawful for Any Power on Earth to Compel in Matters of Religion

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Re-printed for J. Johnson, 1790 - Church and state - 47 pages
 

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During the 1650s, three close philosophical friends separately articulated principles of freedom of conscience and separation of church and state during the Interregnum period of English history ... Read full review

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Page 14 - For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to the evil. Wilt thou then not be afraid of the power? do that which is good. and thou shalt have praise of the same: for he is a minister of God to thee for good.
Page 31 - For this Agar is mount Sinai in Arabia, and answereth to Jerusalem which now is, and is in bondage with her children. But Jerusalem which is above is free, which is the mother of us all.
Page 34 - Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross; And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a shew of them openly, triumphing over them in it.
Page 39 - The sacrifice of the wicked is abomination: how much more, when he bringeth it with a wicked mind ? 28 A false witness shall perish : but the man that heareth speaketh constantly.
Page 3 - And these being not possible to be understood without this divine illumination, which no man can know at all times to be in himself, much less to be at any time for certain in any other...
Page 10 - They should first interpret to them, that heresy, by what it signifies in that language, is no word of evil note, meaning only the choice or following of any opinion good or bad in religion, or any other learning : and thus not only in heathen authors, but in the New Testament itself, without censure or blame ; Acts xv.
Page 33 - For to this end Chrift both died, and rofe, and revived, that he might be Lord both of the dead and living...
Page 37 - The other reason which follows necessarily is obvious (Gal. ii. 16), and in many other places of St. Paul, as the groundwork and foundation of the whole Gospel, that we are "justified by the faith of Christ, and not by the works of the law.
Page 3 - Whence I here mean by conscience or religion, that full persuasion whereby we are assured that our belief and practice, as far as we are able to apprehend and probably make appear, is according to the will of God and his holy spirit within us, which we ought to follow much rather than any law of man, as not only his word every where bids us, but the very dictate of reason tells us. Acts iv. 19, ' Whether it be right in the sight of God, to hearken to you more than to God, judge ye.

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