Calcutta Review, Volume 1

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University of Calcutta., 1846 - India
 

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Page 80 - To them his heart, his love, his griefs were given, But all his serious thoughts had rest in heaven. As some tall cliff that lifts its awful form, Swells from the vale, and midway leaves the storm, Though round its breast the rolling clouds are spread, Eternal sunshine settles on its head.
Page 293 - An act for establishing certain regulations for the better management of the affairs of the East India Company, as well in India as in Europe...
Page 55 - ... how much in all ages have wounds and shrieks and tears been the cheap and vulgar resources of the rulers of mankind ; how difficult and how noble it is to govern in kindness and to found an empire upon the everlasting basis of justice and affection ! But what do men call vigour?
Page 101 - Ecclesiastes, the title of which is placed at the head of this article. His explanations of that most remarkable book, unique among the writings of either Testament, are interesting to the alumni of Andover for old acquaintance...
Page 565 - Mary had a little lamb, Its fleece was white as snow, And everywhere that Mary went The lamb was sure to go; He followed her to school one day — That was against the rule. It made the children laugh and play To see a lamb at school.
Page 60 - State than such as shall be actually committing hostilities or making preparations as aforesaid, .or to make such treaty for guaranteeing the possessions of any Prince or State, but upon the consideration of such Prince or State actually engaging to assist the Company against such hostilities commenced, or preparations made as aforesaid ; and in all cases where hostilities shall be commenced or treaty made, the said...
Page 100 - Indians, exhibits a perfect pattern of the qualities which should distinguish the instructor of rude and barbarous tribes ; the most invincible patience and self-denial, the profoundest humility, exquisite prudence, indefatigable industry, and such a devotedness to God, or rather such an absorption of the whole soul in zeal for the divine glory and the salvation of men, as is scarcely to be paralleled since the age of the apostles.
Page 60 - And whereas to pursue schemes of conquest and extension of dominion in India are measures repugnant to the wish, the honor, and policy of this nation...
Page 525 - British army and an enemy approaching from the west, if indeed such an enemy there can be, and no longer between the army and its supplies. The enormous expenditure required for the support of a large force, in a false military position, at a distance from its own frontier and its resources, will no longer arrest every measure for the improvement of the country and of the people.
Page 114 - There was much visible concern among them while I was discoursing publicly ; but afterwards when I spoke to one and another more particularly, whom I perceived under much concern, the power of God seemed to descend upon the assembly " like a rushing mighty wind," and with an astonishing energy bore down all before it.

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