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been as yet found on this site is the rémains of a foundation, the great; er parts of which had been cleared out and broken by the canal: the bricks were soft and friable. This foundation was sunk about four feet in the black soil, terminating on its surface ; the great quantity of bricks however‘ scattered in the canal bed proves distinctly that many more foundations had been cleared out, and it is possible that when I‘, have time to sink wells in neighbouring points, so as to detect the boundaries of these ruins, I may bring to light matters of greater inter-. est than those even now before us. The bricks discovered are of a large size, and generally speaking, badly burned,‘ (similar to some that were found on a former occasion at Manukmow, near Sehémunpdr, where a quantity of old foundations were discovered, consisting entirely of the

same sized bricks :) a number of them wedge-shaped Q as if-.

intended for well building, and better burned than the square ones.“ Amongst the fragments-of pots, were some which the natives recognised; as resembling those now used in making indigo, long elliptical vessels’ !‘ the fragments of pots, bones, teeth, and articles of this description are; in abundance. In sinking three wells on the west of the canal near the spot,‘ the same section of soil appeared, and the same articles were discovered on reaching the black stratum. I look forward with great interest to the‘ time when I can have leisure to make further excavations in the neighbourhood, enabling me to form an idea of the extent of the discovery. 4 At a spot considerably south (marked A in the map) a large pukka well was also exposed in the canal channel. I had this cleared out and’ partly removed, supposing that there was a probability of making further discoveries. I send to the Society an article (either lead or pewter)*' which was the only thing of metal found : a great quantity of gharas or‘ water pots were taken out whole, as if they hadfallen into the well and sunk; the bones also of two deer (barasinghas), the horns brokeuin-' pieces, but the jaw bones and other parts tolerably perfect: from the circumstance of finding so many gharras the natives seem to conclude that? this was atown or village well, and not that in use for irrigation‘. If the‘ancient town extended to this point, it would be extensive indeed, but‘ of this there does not appear to be any probability.

The presence of the deer’s bones is easily accounted for, as a number‘ offthese, aswell as other wild animals, are constantly lost in galloping over the jungles, and falling into deserted‘ Wells. The well in question was doubtless one of this description, for a long time after either‘ the town or cultivation for whichit was intended was deserted, and remained long open amongst the high grass and junglewhich so rapidly obtain in this part of the country when the hand of man is absent : all

' This small disc or wheel does not bear any marks of antiquity.—En.

marks of this well were so completely obliterated, that the present canal was excavated over it without its being discovered. The bricks used appear to have been of the same description as the square ones above described.

Amongst the metal articles found in the site of the old town, are a great number of selals orinstruments in use in aHindustani lady’stoilet for applying surma to the eyes, made of copper apparently. To this circumstance my attention was drawn by a native sonar, who observed that now articles of this description were never made of that metal; the great quantity of rolls of metal and wire found would lead a person to suppose that the main exhumation at present consisted of a smith’s shop ! There are some other things, one bearing in some respects a resemblance to a small cannon (17), another to a button hook,&c. &c. The quantity ofslag of iron smelting furnaces is a singular circumstance, for although iron ore is found in the mountains at no great distance, it is not the practice now to import it in that state into the plains.

The number of coins found, and in my possession, is 170, amongst which are two intruders that would, if they belonged to this town, very considerably reduce the antiquity of it ; but from the circumstance of there only being two, and from their appearance (having no mark of that antiquity so eminently conspicuous in all the othercoinsfound), I am much inclined to suspect that some of my myrmidons have been false, or that there are stray coins* ; both of them are sent yvith this letter. My method__of collection was by giving new coin for old, that is to say, new pice for all the old ones, and new rupees for all the old rupees discovered, and remuneration according to the value of other articles : this may have raised the cupidity of some speculator to introduce these two Musulrnan coins into my cabinet. All those upon which any markis apparent, and all other articles worthy of transmission, will be sent to the Society's museum.

I will conclude with a remark, that the accompanying map will give a good idea of the Doab Canal works in the neighbourhood of Behat, shewing its connection with two of its greatest impediments, namely, the Nogaon and Muskura rivers, and the descent between the two at the Belka Falls. During the rains and floods, the regulating bridges being closed with gates, and the dams thrown open, no water whatever passes down the canal, and each river or torrent has its own flood kept to itself ; the size of these rivers, and the quantity of water that they carry, is in high floods very great; at other seasons they are quite dry, and consist

’* Our author need be under no alarm whatever from the presence of these two coins, which must have been purely accidental, and in no way connected with the antiquities of Behat ; for on examination, one turns out to be a pice of Indore, the other of Lakhnao, both known by their respective symbols, and quite modern.—En.

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of extensive beds of sand with scarcely any vegetation. The falls at Belka consists of two chambers thirty-five feet in total breadth, passing in two descents of brick masonry, a fall of 15 feet, a power for machinery that would in any country but this be duly appreciated, and have long ago led to the establishment of a town or city in its neighbourhood, which would have thrown into the shade the submerged city. These falls are worthy of the attention of speculators under the new charter, a point which 'although not directly coming under the views of the Society, may be well referred to, as bringing to notice the dormant claims that the Doab Canal has on those possessed of capital, combined with mechanical skill and energy.

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V .—Note on the Coins, found by Captain Cautley, at Behat. By James Prinsep, Sec., &c.

The accompanying plate (xvii.) exhibits faithful representations of some of the coins presented by Captain CAUTLEY to the Society. Those numbered 1 to 6 are all of the same character, and, as far as Iam ac. guainted, entirely new to Hindu numismatology, although connected by a peculiar symbol with the fifth series of Col. Ton's plate* (fig. 19 of the present plate) ; also with the copper coins 68, 69, of Mr. Wn.soN’l third platef (fig. 22 of the present plate) ; and with fig. 19 of Mn Mnssorfs collection, in plate 9 of the last number of the Journal; all three series in other respects differing materially from one another. Fig. 1. May be looked upon as the type of this new series. It is a

silver coin of the size depicted in the engraving, and weighs 20 grains.

The silver has been so acted upon by long continued burial, that on

arrival in Calcutta, wafered on to the folds of a letter for security,

the removal of the wafer stripped off a thin film of silver from its surface. The impression however is still perfect and in deep relief.

Obverse. On one side we perceive a female figure clothed, holding in her right hand a stalk, bearing on its summit a large open flower :—(this emblem will be seen below to be common to another class of Indian coins ;) on her right stands an animal, of the precise character of which it is diflicult to make any positive assertion :—it has astout straight trunk, which might pass forthat of adeer, or of a horse,but theheadmore resembles that ofa bird, and it is surmounted with a radiated crest, which at first sight wears the appearance of horns. On the left of this nondescript animal is a symbol or monogram much resembling character 5 of the Allahabad inscription, No. I, but square, instead of round, in the body. There are other characters round the margin but partially visible.

* Trans. Roy. As. Soc. vol. i. T As. Res. vol. xvii.

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